Grimshaw unveils “world’s largest airport terminal under one roof” for Istanbul

News: a design team led by London firm Grimshaw has revealed plans for a new six-runway airport in Istanbul capable of accommodating up to 150 million passengers a year.

Istanbul Airport by Grimshaw, Nordic and Haptic

The Grimshaw-led team, which also includes Norwegian firm Nordic Office of Architecture and London studio Haptic, says the Istanbul New Airport Terminal One will become the "world's largest airport terminal under one roof", covering a site of nearly 100 hectares.

Described by the designers as "modern and highly functional, with a unique sense of place", the terminal will feature a vaulted canopy dotted with skylights. These will focus daylight onto key sections of the interior, including check-in desks, passport control and shops.

Istanbul Airport by Grimshaw, Nordic and Haptic

The airport will be located 20 miles outside the city on the Black Sea coast. It will be built in four phases, with the first expected to open in 2018 and serve up to 90 million passengers a year.

A large plaza and transport hub will be built at the entrance, allowing the airport to integrate with existing rail, metro and bus routes.

Istanbul Airport by Grimshaw, Nordic and Haptic

Grimshaw recently completed an airport in St Petersburg with golden ceilings, designed to reference the gilded spires of the Russian city's churches. But partner Andrew Thomas says this new project will aim to capture "design worthy of the world city of Istanbul".

"The Istanbul airport attempts to reconcile the requirements for a top modern, functional airport with something that is rooted in local identity," added Haptic director Tomas Stokke.

"We were inspired by the local use of colours and patterns, the quality of light and how it penetrates buildings, as well as by traditional architecture such as the Süleymaniye Mosque."

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Italian design production “could disappear,” says Alberto Alessi

Alberto-Alessi-portrait

News: Italy's design manufacturing capability is at risk of disappearing, according to the president of design brand Alessi.

The country's producers could go the same way as its great designers of the last century and be outsourced abroad, Alberto Alessi told Dezeen.

"The risk is that it disappears," he said in an interview in Milan last week during the Salone del Mobile. "Maybe Italian production will disappear."

Alessi said that until the 1970s, Italian design was characterised by Italian designers working for Italian manufacturers.

"Then during the 80s we had some important change," Alessi said, as Italian industry started to work with foreign designers. "Design expressed through the catalogue of Italian design factories was not any more Italian," he said.

Today, he said, "maybe the second element, Italian production, will disappear."

The company, which specialises in kitchen accessories and tableware, was founded in 1921 by Alberto Alessi's grandfather Giovanni Alessi and today employs around 500 people at its factory in Crusinallo on Lake Orta in northern Italy. Its annual turnover is around €100 million.

One of the best-known of Italy's design-led manufacturers, Alessi started out as a producer of stainless steel utensils for the catering industry but, like many successful Italian "design factories", began collaborating with external designers in the fifties and sixties.

Famous Alessi collaborations include the 9090 espresso machine designed by Richard Sapper, the Juicy Salif lemon squeezer by Philippe Starck and the Record watch by Achille Castiglioni.

Foreign competition and Italy's lingering economic woes are creating problems for Italy's design houses. In May last year Claudio Luti, president of both the Kartell brand and the Salone del Mobile, said the failure of the country's small, family run firms to seek investment and explore foreign markets was a "big, big mistake."

Last September Patrizia Moroso, head of Italian furniture brand Moroso, said Italy was "in crisis" while Milan was "sitting in the past".

"Italy... is very much in a crisis because it doesn't want to change, doesn't want to move and is becoming very old,” she said, adding that the country was "losing the culture behind production.”

Alberto Alessi said his company was committed to maintaining its production base in Italy but said he was "concerned" that Italian manufacturing would go the same way as Italian design, and migrate abroad.

But he added that, even if this happened, the notion of "Italian design" would continue, because of the country's unique culture of collaboration between designer and manufacturer.

"I think that [Italy] will continue to have Italian design because it has not only to do with the nationality of the designer but it has to do with a culture," he said. "We are a kind of mediator. The core of our activity is to mediate endlessly between on one side the best creativity in product design from all over the world and on the other side, customers."

"This culture makes Italian design factories the best labs to offer to designers to make real their designs," he added. "When they enter the door of Alessi, the designer or architect immediately feels he will meet people who will do their best to help him express what he has inside."

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Architectural culture is “moving in two directions” says Shigeru Ban

Shigeru Ban portrait

News: young architects are becoming disillusioned with commercial work and instead turning to humanitarian projects, according to 2014 Pritzker Prize winner Shigeru Ban (+ interview).

Natural disasters such as the Japanese tsunami are "really changing" the way young architects think, Ban believes, encouraging them to use their skills for humanitarian causes.

"When I was a student everyone was working for big developers to make big buildings," Ban said. "And now there are many students and younger architects who are asking to join my team, to open programs in disaster areas."

He added: "It's really changing. I'm really encouraged."

Ban made the comments to journalists at the Salone del Mobile in Milan, where he was taking part in the Where Architects Live installation.

Shigeru Ban's installation in the Where Architects Live exhibition
Shigeru Ban's installation in the Where Architects Live exhibition

Architectural culture is "moving in two directions", he told Dezeen, as a new breed of younger architects turn away from urban work, where architects had ceded control to developers.

"Now cities are being made by developers, not architects, or not urban planners. They're made by developers. So one way is this but many people are interested in working for society also."

Ban is well known for his humanitarian work, creating temporary shelters from cardboard-based structures in disaster zones around the world.

His first paper-tube buildings were used to provide temporary homes for Vietnamese refugees after the Kobe earthquake in 1995. He has since created emergency shelters in India, Taiwan, Haiti and Japan as well as a cardboard cathedral for earthquake-hit Christchurch in New Zealand.

Cardboard-Cathedral-by-Shigeru-Ban_dezeen
The Cardboard Cathedral in Chirstchurch by Shigeru Ban

This work helped him secure the 2014 Pritzker Prize, which is widely regarded as the highest honour in world architecture.

Announcing the award last month, Pritzker Prize jury chairman Peter Palumbo said: "Shigeru Ban is a force of nature, which is entirely appropriate in the light of his voluntary work for the homeless and dispossessed in areas that have been devastated by natural disasters."

Ban has also realised a number of arts projects including the Centre Pompidou Metz in France and his Aspen Art Museum is due to complete this summer.

Aspen Art Museum by Shigeru Ban
Aspen Art Museum by Shigeru Ban

The Where Architects Live exhibition in Milan focuses features a series of installations based on the domestic environments of nine eminent designers, based in eight different cities, including Ban, Daniel Libeskind, Zaha Hadid and David Chipperfield.

Here's a transcript of the conversation between Ban, Dezeen and other journalists at the Salone del Mobile:


Journalist: Do you work a lot on projects for refugees?

Shigeru Ban: Yes with natural disasters. Yes almost every year some disaster. Now I'm working in the Philippines after the big typhoon there last year.

Journalist: What are you doing there?

Shigeru Ban: Building temporary housing there.

Journalist: What can you advise to young architects?

Shigeru Ban: You know, I really recognise when I give lectures to many different places in the countries, when I was a student everyone was working for big developers to make big buildings. And now there are many students and younger architects who are asking to join my team, to open programs in disaster areas, it's really changing. I'm really encouraged by all the young architects and students.

Marcus Fairs: Is that just in Japan that it's changing?

Shigeru Ban: No, no, no everywhere. Everywhere I got to give lectures many students are interested in what I'm doing and they want to join me and my team, it's really encouraging.

Marcus Fairs: So you think there's a shift in the world of architecture maybe?

Shigeru Ban: I think so, I really think so.

Marcus Fairs: Towards helping people more?

Shigeru Ban: Maybe not shifting but [moving in] two directions. Because now cities are being made by developers, not architects, or not urban planners. They're made by developers. So one way is this but many people are interested in working for society also.

Marcus Fairs: So there's new opportunities for architects to be more human, to be more helpful?

Shigeru Ban: Yes because unfortunately there are so many natural disasters destroying the housing, destroying the buildings so there are many opportunities for us.

Marcus Fairs: And in Japan did the tsunami change the attitudes?

Shigeru Ban: Yes, over 500km of coastline was totally damaged. Now the recovery is quite slow because they have to reclaim the land higher to prevent the next tsunami. So also changing of zoning to put residential areas on top of the mountains, so it's a very slow process. But it's the first time, even in Japan, that they're facing such a big problem.

Marcus Fairs: So are a lot of humanitarian architects working to solve the problem?

Shigeru Ban: Yes many architects are now working in that field, yes.

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Massimo Morozzi, co-founder of Archizoom, dies aged 73

Massimo Morozzi

News: Italian architect and designer Massimo Morozzi, co-founder of influential architecture studio Archizoom Associati and later art director for furniture brand Edra, has died aged 73.

Born in Florence in 1941, Morozzi co-founded Archizoom in 1966 together with artist Andrea Branzi and architects Gilberto Corretti and Paolo Deganello.

Together with studios UFO and Superstudio, the founders became known as the "Italian Radicals". Archizoom's projects included pop-art inspired furniture and the influential but unbuilt "No-Stop City" proposal for a city built on an infinitely expanding grid. The studio disbanded in 1974.

Morozzi then pursued a successful career as an industrial designer, opening his own studio in 1982 and working with brands including Alessi and Cassina and developing a concept car for Nissan. He became art director of Edra in 1987.

Announcing his father's death on Instagram, his son Guido Morozzi wrote: "Father, husband, friend freethinker, man of fine intellect, avant garde-minded artist, architect, inventor, creator of beauty through design, teacher, cook, grandfather. Bye dad, I'll miss you."

Massimo Morozzi was born on 28 January 1941 and died on 10 April 2014.

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Archizoom co-founder Massimo Morozzi dies aged 73

Massimo Morozzi

News: Italian architect and designer Massimo Morozzi, co-founder of influential architecture studio Archizoom Associati and later art director for furniture brand Edra, has died aged 73.

Born in Florence in 1941, Morozzi co-founded Archizoom in 1966 together with artist Andrea Branzi and architects Gilberto Corretti and Paolo Deganello.

Together with studios UFO and Superstudio, the founders became known as the "Italian Radicals". Archizoom's projects included pop art-inspired furniture and the influential but unbuilt "No-Stop City" proposal for a city built on an infinitely expanding grid. The studio disbanded in 1974.

Morozzi then pursued a successful career as an industrial designer, opening his own studio in 1982 and working with brands including Alessi and Cassina and developing a concept car for Nissan. He became art director of Edra in 1987.

Announcing his father's death on Instagram, his son Guido Morozzi wrote: "Father, husband, friend freethinker, man of fine intellect, avant garde-minded artist, architect, inventor, creator of beauty through design, teacher, cook, grandfather. Bye dad, I'll miss you."

Massimo Morozzi was born on 28 January 1941 and died on 10 April 2014.

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Ignore the critics – Beethoven was “a failure” in their eyes too, says Daniel Libeskind

Libeskind-portrait_dezeen

News: architect Daniel Libeskind has hit back at his critics, comparing his own work to Beethoven's Fifth Symphony and saying that he doesn't try to be liked, at the launch of an exhibition in Milan this week.

Speaking to Dezeen at the launch of Where Architects Live, a major installation of pavilions, photographs and films about the homes of starchitects, Libeskind said that it takes time for the public to appreciate greatness.

"When things are first shown they are difficult," Libeskind told Dezeen. "If you read the reviews of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, it was a failure, a horrible piece of music."

"You have to give it time. Architecture is not just for the moment, it is not just for the next fashion magazine. It's for the twenty, thirty, fifty, one hundred, two hundred years if it's good; that's sustainability."

Asked if he was bothered by the high levels of criticism his recent work has received, Libeskind replied that he never reads his critics and said that he doesn't try to be liked.

"It's a democratic world, they can say whatever they want," he said. "How can I read them? I have more important things to read."

He also made reference to a passage from the Bible, adding "look at 6:26. "Woe be to the man who is liked by everyone". So if you read the New Testament, don't try to be liked by everyone and do what you believe in."

Libeskind cemented his reputation as a major name with the Jewish Museum in Berlin, which opened in 2001, but in recent years has come under attack from critics of his angular style.

Speaking about Libeskind's plans for the World Trade Centre rebuilding project in 2008, LA Times critic Christopher Hawthorne said: "anyone looking for signs that Daniel Libeskind's work might deepen profoundly over time, or shift in some surprising direction, has mostly been doing so in vain."

British philosopher Roger Scruton accused Libeskind of being one of a group of architects who "have equipped themselves with a store of pretentious gobbledegook with which to explain their genius to those who are otherwise unable to perceive it," in an article in the UK's Times newspaper in 2011.

In 2012, novelist Will Self accused Libeskind of putting money before art in an outspoken attack on high profile architects reported in British architecture magazine BD.

And last year architecture critic Owen Hatherley said that Libeskind's students' union for London Metropolitan University "was one of the first instances where it became crystal clear that Libeskind's formal repertoire of Caspar David Friedrich crashing and banging was not, actually, about war or the Holocaust."

"All of its vaulting, aggressive gestures were designed to "put London Met on the map", and to give an image of fearless modernity with, however, little of consequence to actually do," wrote Hatherley in BD.

Libeskind added that critics will become less relevant as we enter a new era of change where "everyone can compose Beethoven's Fifth".

"We don't live in the era of the old fashioned idea of masterpieces done by the masters," he said. "Everybody isn't powered to be creative and in a democratic society – it is freedom that creates the beauty, it's not authorities. I think that is the era of change."

Photograph is by Davide Pizzigoni.

Below is an edited transcript from our conversation with Libeskind at the opening of Where Architects Live:


Journalist: Why did you decide to show your house in this exhibition?

Daniel Libeskind: It's very simple, I decided to show my house because a house is not really private. I have no secrets, so all the secrets are shown and of course my house is not just about just furniture and light.

You know the house is the most important space because that's where people live. That's where they go to sleep, that's where they meet, that's where they have their intimate moments. So there can be nothing more important than the domestic environment. The domestic environment is no longer seen as some mechanical functionalistic machine to live in, in my view, and it is something that has to do with the global memory with where we are, where we are coming from and where we are going.

Journalist: How is this changing?

Daniel Libeskind: First of all, the house changes with every look of a person, with every glance, with every shift of the eye, with every face, with every piece of light that comes through the house. The house doesn't just change, the house is actually heavy. It's difficult to change the physical but today with objects, with furniture, with interiors, with internet, with the world-wide-web, we can live actually elsewhere to where we are. We can be in New York and be living in Tokyo, we can be in Africa and live in Milano. So we are interconnected and this is the connection which created completely a new social idea of the what the world is, what the genius loci is and where we are located.

Marcus Fairs: Daniel, your work sometimes gets a lot of criticism. Do you pay any attention to the critics?

Daniel Libeskind: You know, if you read the New Testament, look at 6:26. "Woe be to the man who is liked by everyone". So if you read the New Testament, there is a warning, don't try to be liked by everyone and do what you believe in. And of course, when things are first shown they are difficult. You know, if you read the review of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, it was a failure, they thought it a horrible piece of music. You have to give it time. Architecture is not just for the moment, it is not just for the next fashion magazine. It's for the next twenty, thirty, fifty, one hundred, two hundred years if it's good; that's sustainability. Sustainability is not just clever technologies. Having a house becomes part of something important.

Marcus Fairs: So do you compare your work to Beethoven's Fifth then if people don't understand how your buildings might be perceived in the future?

Daniel Libeskind: Hey, you know something? Today everyone can compose Beethoven's Fifth. We don't live in the era of the old fashioned idea of masterpieces done by the masters, everybody isn't powered to be creative and in a democratic society, it is freedom that creates the beauty, it's not authorities. I think that is the era of change. Everybody has the impetus to be an artist, to create their own house environment. To do something which is beautiful that is desirable by them and not just put to them through the market, through the power of systems, through ideology. I think we're in a great Renaissance era of rediscovery and that human beings are at the centre, not technology.

Marcus Fairs: So you're not bothered by your critics then?

Daniel Libeskind: Look I never read them. It's a democratic world, people can say whatever they want.

Marcus Fairs: You never read them, did you say?

Daniel Libeskind: How can I read them? I have more important things to read.

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“If I listen to the market, I’ll be designing crap” says Jaime Hayon

Jaime-Hayon-portrait

News: analysing trends and listening to what consumers want will ultimately result in bad design, says Spanish designer Jaime Hayon.

"If I listen to the market, I'll be designing crap because many times it's good not taste, it's excessive," Jaime Hayon told Dezeen during an interview in Milan, where he is showing a new multi-purpose table for Republic of Fritz Hansen.

He said that brands and designers should "ignore the market" and pursue quality rather than trying to please the masses.

"If you start to analyse the market and try to think that you're going to be able to make the perfect sofa, forget it," he said. "Sometimes you get a brief with analytics, you can laugh at it."

The exuberant tastes of consumers in the lucrative markets of Russia, Asia and the Middle East might to blame for some of the bad-quality products currently for sale, according to Hayon.

"What people in Dubai, India, the Middle East and Russia want, is that what rules? Is that what [everyone] wants?" he asked.

Hayon admits that convincing a company to disregard their customer's preferences is not an easy task, but thinks this is the only way to achieve the best results.

"It's very hard to say that to a marketing director [of a brand] "ignore the market", but honestly it's the only way to get the glory of things, it's the only way to get results."

He believes that brand owners should listen to, and trust, the designers they are working with and focus on the quality of the products.

"The markets rule everything, the sizes, the periods, the options," he explained. "When an owner of a company says "I don't want that anymore, what I want is to hear what the artists and the designer wants to say, in relation to what I feel about my own company", quality is a big word."

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Herzog & de Meuron wins contest for Danish forest hospital

News: Herzog & de Meuron has won a competition to design a hospital in a Danish forest, with plans for a building shaped like a four-leaf clover (+ slideshow).

New North Hospital by Herzog & de Meuron

Located north of Copenhagen in Hillerød, the New North Zealand Hospital will be Herzog & de Meuron's first project in Scandinavia and will be completed in collaboration with local firm Vilhelm Lauritzen Architects.

New North Hospital by Herzog & de Meuron

The building is conceived as a low-rise pavilion-like structure that never exceeds four storeys in height. A total of 24 medical departments will be housed inside and a large garden will be located on the roof.

New North Hospital by Herzog & de Meuron

Herzog & de Meuron says the structure will demonstrate that architectural ambition and functionality can be combined within a hospital.

"The choice of the jury is a seminal sign to architects and the entire health-care sector: low, flat hospital buildings can be better integrated in the city or the countryside than the high-rises structures that were often realised in the last decades," said the studio.

New North Hospital by Herzog & de Meuron

"The hospital organically reaches out into the wide landscape. Simultaneously its soft, flowing form binds the many components of the hospital. It is a low building that fosters exchange between staff and patients, and it has a human scale despite its very large size."

New North Hospital by Herzog & de Meuron

The building is scheduled to open in 2020, but could also facilitate an expansion in 2050.

New North Hospital by Herzog & de Meuron

"Herzog & de Meuron have designed a patient-centred hospital – a beautiful, healing and functional building that supports our patients' recovery in the best possible way," said hospital director Bente Ourø Rørth. "The hospital's great strength is its highly successful and fundamental fusion of form and function."

New North Hospital by Herzog & de Meuron

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“Virtual design” is making life difficult for furniture companies says Marcel Wanders

Marcel Wanders portrait

News: the proliferation of computer renderings and prototypes on sites like Dezeen is making real products "look extremely boring," according to Dutch designer Marcel Wanders.

Furniture brands are struggling to make their products appear interesting in comparison to online fantasies, said Wanders in an exclusive interview with Dezeen.

"You are so able to present every crazy idea as if it is reality, the whole universe of communication is so strong," said Wanders. "But now it's difficult for a company to be anywhere interesting in a world that is so dominated by prototypes and great and bright ideas."

"The Dezeens of this world are extremely inspirational, but have no realistic dimension any more," he added.

Wanders was speaking to Dezeen in Milan at the launch of the latest collection by Moooi, the furniture and lighting brand he co-founded in 2001 with Casper Vissers.

Moooi exhibition Milan 2014
This year's Moooi exhibition in Milan. Photograph is by Nicole Marnati

Moooi has grown rapidly by recruiting a roster of international designers to create unusual products that sit alongside new work by Wanders, who was one of a generation of Dutch creatives nurtured by conceptual design company Droog.

"It's funny that in the 1990s Droog was doing all this wonderful work," Wanders said. "It was interesting that we kind of invented something which I call today 'virtual design'. We started making prototypes as if they were real, we communicated them in Milano as if you could buy them. That was at the same time a kind of communication being invented as a mass medium."

Today, designers are able to get international attention for products that are not ready for market and in many cases don't even exist as prototypes, Wanders said.

"Now I think it is so big, this virtual design, the prototypes are so important in the world of design and the alternative ideas are so important," he said.

"Now you go on Dezeen and you go through the pages and you find a company like Cassina and oh my God, I mean it's not even their fault, how could they be interesting between all these bright and virtual ideas which nobody is ever going to do? How could a chair or a lamp be interesting?"

"All that is realistic starts to look extremely boring in the world of all this inspirational stuff. It's a really interesting problem that we're going to face. It's a bit difficult to be in such an exciting world because they to start to feel really boring."

Moooi's exhibition is open until 13 April at Via Savona 56 in Milan.

Marcel Wanders image is courtesy of DesignPress.

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David Chipperfield triumphs in Nobel Center competition

News: "An architecture challenge doesn't come much better than this," says David Chipperfield, who has been named winner in the competition to design a new home for the Nobel Prize in Stockholm (+ slideshow).

David Chipperfield triumphs in Nobel Center competition

David Chipperfield Architects saw off competition from Swedish studios Wingårdh and Johan Celsing Arkitektkontor to land the prestigious commission to create the Nobel Center – an exhibition centre and events venue for the award that recognises advances in science and culture.

David Chipperfield triumphs in Nobel Center competition

"I think all projects are important but this project has enormous meaning, not just for the city of Stockholm but internationally. An architecture challenge doesn't come much better than this," said Chipperfield.

David Chipperfield triumphs in Nobel Center competition

The architect's vision is for a shimmering brass-clad building on the waterfront. It will be fully glazed on the ground floor, opening out to a new city park on the sunny south-eastern side of the site.

David Chipperfield triumphs in Nobel Center competition

"The jury finds the lightness and openness of the building very appealing and consistent with the Nobel Foundation's explicit ambition to create an open and welcoming centre for the general public," said Nobel Foundation executive director Lars Heikensten, who was a member of the judging panel.

David Chipperfield triumphs in Nobel Center competition

"We view the winning proposal as a concrete interpretation of the Nobel Prize as Sweden’s most important symbol in the world. Stockholm will gain a building – magnificent but without pomp, powerful yet graceful – with qualities like those the City Hall gave the capital a century ago."

David Chipperfield triumphs in Nobel Center competition

Fellow jury member Per Wästberg added: "We view the winning proposal as a concrete interpretation of the Nobel Prize as Sweden's most important symbol in the world. Stockholm will gain a building – magnificent but without pomp, powerful yet graceful – with qualities like those the City Hall gave the capital a century ago."

David Chipperfield triumphs in Nobel Center competition

As well as hosting the annual award ceremony each December, the building will provide a public centre for exhibitions, educational activities, events and meetings.

David Chipperfield triumphs in Nobel Center competition
Proposed site plan

"It can be spectacular on its greatest night, but also it can be very useful and functional and working the rest of the year," said Chipperfield.

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