First Inflatable Concert Hall

Du 27 septembre au 13 octobre, le projet Ark Nova se tient au Japon et propose un auditorium mobile gonflable qui accueillera un concert Lucerne Festival Orchestra. Installée à Matsushima, cette incroyable création a été dessinée par l’artiste Anish Kapoor et réalisée par le bureau d’architecture Arata Isozaki.

First Inflatable Concert Hall7
First Inflatable Concert Hall6
First Inflatable Concert Hall3
First Inflatable Concert Hall2
First Inflatable Concert Hall1
First Inflatable Concert Hall8

Ark Nova by Arata Isozaki and Anish Kapoor

Two years after a major earthquake and tsunami hit Japan, architect Arata Isozaki and artist Anish Kapoor have completed an inflatable mobile concert hall that will tour affected regions (+ slideshow).

Ark Nova by Arata Isozaki and Anish Kapoor

Japanese architect Arata Isozaki teamed up with Indian-born Anish Kapoor to design the orb-like structure, which is modelled on the inflatable Leviathan sculptures created by the artist for a past exhibition in Paris.

Ark Nova by Arata Isozaki and Anish Kapoor

The 500-seat performance venue is designed to stage performances ranging from orchestras and chamber music to jazz, theatre, dance and art, and it will host the Lucerne Festival of music this autumn in Matsushima.

Ark Nova by Arata Isozaki and Anish Kapoor

“We named the Project Ark Nova, or ‘new ark’, with the hope that it will become a symbol of recovery immediately after the great earthquake disaster,” said the designers.

Ark Nova by Arata Isozaki and Anish Kapoor

“Ark Nova obviously can’t carry people and animals to escape from disaster, but we conceived the ark to travel packed with music and various arts, from the perspective of long-term rebuilding of culture and spirit,” they added.

Ark Nova by Arata Isozaki and Anish Kapoor

The walls of the structure are made from a stretchy plastic membrane, designed to enable quick erection and dismantling. To transport it to a new venue, the orb is completely deflated and loaded onto the back of a lorry alongside the disassembled equipment.

Ark Nova by Arata Isozaki and Anish Kapoor

The designers first revealed their concept for Ark Nova back in September 2011. Arata Isozaki also recently completed the national convention centre in Qatar, while Anish Kapoor’s latest collaborations include the 115 metre-high sculpture at the London 2012 Olympic Park.

Ark Nova by Arata Isozaki and Anish Kapoor

See more architecture by Arata Isozaki »
See more projects by Anish Kapoor »

Here’s more information from the festival organisers:


Lucerne Festival Ark Nova 2013 in Matsushima Two years have passed since the unforgettable earthquake and tsunami occurred in East Japan. As time goes by and the momentum for support of reconstruction wanes, Lucerne Festival one of Europe’s leading music festivals, has formally launched the Lucerne Festival Ark Nova in association with a Japanese concert management company with the aim of bringing hope through music to regions afflicted by the Great East Japan Earthquake that struck on March 11, 2011. Lucerne Festival Ark Nova 2013 in Matsushima will be held this autumn in Matsushima-machi, Miyagi Prefecture. International architect Arata Isozaki is collaborating with India native and UK resident sculptor Anish Kapoor to develop a mobile concert hall with a capacity of 500 people. In this hall and the surrounding area, called Ark Nova, various programs will be held during the period, blending performances of world artists, centered around Lucerne Festival, and musical expression activities of the Tohoku region.

About Lucerne Festival Ark Nova

Lucerne Festival Ark Nova was initiated immediately after the great earthquake by Lucerne Festival, the Swiss international music festival. “ARK” as in “Noah’s Ark”, and NOVA, meaning “new”. In the famous great flood legend of the Old Testament/Book of Genesis, Noah boards his family and animals on an ark, and after the floodwater recedes, a rainbow is formed. In a nod to this story, we named the Project “new ark” = Ark Nova with the hope that it will become a symbol of recovery immediately after the great earthquake disaster. Ark Nova obviously can’t carry people and animals to escape from disaster, but we conceived the ark to travel packed with music and various arts, from the perspective of long-term rebuilding of culture and spirit. We also recalled a key concept that Japanese folklorist Shinobu Orikuchi coined as “marebito (sacred guests)”. This is the concept that “marebito” from foreign lands brought religions and festivals and revitalised society as a result. This could also be considered the principle of how the arts came into existence. Ark Nova will visit all over the disaster regions as a “marebito” and generate activities putting the spotlight on each location as it interacts with locals. Although the project was born as a result of the earthquake, we aim to develop a structure that can extend beyond rebuilding to create “ARS NOVA”, meaning “new arts”.

Outline of Concert Hall

The concert hall Ark Nova created by Arata Isozaki and Anish Kapoor is an air-inflated membrane structure which equipped with the necessary stage and sound equipment. The membrane can be folded up and the equipment dismantled and loaded on a truck, so they can be brought to each site. The interior is a single uninterrupted space which, depending on the arrangement of equipment, is a multistage format which can accommodate various events from orchestras to chamber music, jazz, the performing arts or exhibitions. It is envisioned to seat 500 during an orchestra performance, and is planned to have a width of 30m, length of 36m and maximum height of 18m.

The post Ark Nova by Arata Isozaki
and Anish Kapoor
appeared first on Dezeen.

ArcelorMittal Orbit: “friendly giant” or “vanity project”?


Dezeen Wire:
the completed ArcelorMittal Orbit tower has opened its doors to critics, who unlike Dezeen readers have welcomed the gigantic steel structure by artist Anish Kapoor and structural engineer Cecil Balmond.

Reporting for the Guardian, art critic Jonathan Jones suggests that the sculpture’s opponents are “missing a lot of fun”. Despite comparing the tower’s form to a bulbous living creature that might “vacuum up the Olympic crowd, or fart on everyone” the writer declares the project to be “extremely coherent in its meaning”.

Mark Hudson of the Telegraph says that the Orbit doesn’t fail to overwhelm and entertain, and calls the project ”a challenging twist on the idea of the tower as viewing point and visitor attraction”.

However, in an article for art magazine Frieze journalist Douglas Murphy suggests that unlike monuments such as the Eiffel Tower and the Statue of Liberty, the Orbit has a “jolly abstraction” that is “a telling reflection of its blankly cynical patronage”.

While the design appears to have divided opinion, the £15 price tag of each ticket has been unanimously criticised. In an interview with the BBC even Anish Kapoor agrees that the cost is “a hell of a lot of money”.

When we first revealed the design back in 2010 readers were outraged by it. Read the original story and comments here and see images of the completed tower here.

Read more stories about the London 2012 Olympics in our dedicated category.

ArcelorMittal Orbit by Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond

ArcelorMittal Orbit by Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond

Construction of the controversial 115 metre-high sculpture that artist Anish Kapoor and structural engineer Cecil Balmond designed for the London 2012 Olympic park is now complete.

ArcelorMittal Orbit by Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond

Visitors will enter a central elevator to ascend the steel tower, named the ArcelorMittal Orbit, arriving at an observation deck with a panoramic view of the city. To exit, they will be encouraged to climb down a staircase of 455 steps that spirals around the tower’s exterior.

ArcelorMittal Orbit by Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond

Around 560 metres of red tubular steel form the structure and 250 coloured spotlights illuminate it at night. Internal fit-out will begin later this month and the attraction will open to the public before the games begin in July.

ArcelorMittal Orbit by Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond

The project suffered a huge backlash when the initial plans were revealed back in 2010. See the comments from Dezeen readers here.

See also: our earlier stories about completed Olympic venues the aquatics centre, the velodrome and the main stadium, and see all our stories about the London 2012 Olympics here.

Photography is by ArcelorMittal.

Here’s some more information from the London Mayor’s Office:


ArcelorMittal Orbit unveiled to the world

Main construction of the London 2012 landmark is declared complete.

ArcelorMittal, tier two sponsor of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games and the world’s leading steel company, will today offer a preview of the completed ArcelorMittal Orbit – the 114.5 metre sculpture designed by Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond which will stand at the heart of the Olympic Park.

The ArcelorMittal Orbit is being handed over to the London Legacy Development Corporation later this month, so that Balfour Beatty Workplace can complete the fit-out ahead of the London 2012 Games where it will be a ticketed visitor attraction.

The press event will be attended by the team behind the sculpture, including Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond, Lakshmi N. Mittal, Chairman and CEO, ArcelorMittal, and Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, alongside the architects, engineers and builders who have helped bring the project to reality. For the first time, attendees to the unveiling will be able to travel up to the viewing platform and enjoy a panoramic view of up to 20 miles, encompassing the entire Olympic Park and London’s skyline beyond. At 114.5m, the ArcelorMittal Orbit is the UK’s tallest sculpture and stands 22 metres taller than New York City’s Statue of Liberty.

“It gives me great pride to see the ArcelorMittal Orbit standing not only as a completed work of public art but as a physical symbol of the Olympic spirit,” comments Lakshmi N. Mittal, Chairman and CEO of ArcelorMittal. “It makes me very proud that ArcelorMittal plants from across the world contributed to this showcase of the strength and versatility of steel,” he adds.

Boris Johnson: “This 114.5metre-high attraction to trump rivals the world over is a calling card for investment in east London. It is a symbol of prosperity and growth, backed by one of the world’s most astute business leaders, which delivers the strongest message that this part of London is open for business after decades of neglect.

“In addition to the £11billion plus investment that has taken place around the Olympics over the last four years, the ArcelorMittal Orbit will draw visitors to newly regenerated swathes of east London in perpetuity and has changed our skyline and aspirations forever. The development of this area, creating new jobs, homes, schools, and thriving communities beyond the Olympics, is one of the most important regeneration priorities as we lay the ground now to meet the needs of the next 25 years.”

Anish Kapoor: “I am absolutely delighted that construction is now complete and I would like to thank the project team for making this possible and for their work on what is technically a very challenging project. I am looking forward to the Olympics when visitors to the Park will be able to go up the ArcelorMittal Orbit for the first time and I am delighted that members of the public will be able to interact with the work in this way.”

Cecil Balmond: “Anish and I were conscious from the beginning that the ArcelorMittal Orbit would be a lasting legacy to the city and so we wanted to stretch the language of the icon as far we could go. The Orbit is a hybrid, a network of art and structure, and its dynamic is the non-linear. You read into it multiple narratives in space.”

One of the world’s leading artists, Turner Prize winning Anish Kapoor studied in London, where he is now based. He is well known for his use of rich pigment and imposing, yet popular works, such as Marsyas, which filled the Tate’s Turbine Hall as part of the Unilever Series, Cloud Gate in Chicago’s Millennium Park and his recent record breaking show at the Royal Academy, the most successful exhibition ever presented by a contemporary artist in London.

The ArcelorMittal Orbit was designed by Anish Kapoor and one of the world’s leading structural designers, Cecil Balmond, who trained and lives in London, and is known for his innovative work on some of the greatest contemporary buildings in the world, such as the CCTV building in Beijing, as well as many Serpentine Gallery Pavilion commissions.

Construction of the ArcelorMittal Orbit took 18 months and required 560 metres of tubular red steel to form the sculpture’s lattice superstructure. The result is a bold statement of public art that is both permanent and sustainable, with close to 60 per cent of the 2,000 tonnes of steel used in the sculpture being drawn from recycled sources, underlining steel’s status as the world’s most recyclable material. Steel was chosen for the ArcelorMittal Orbit because of its unique properties including strength, modular structure and advantages of weight and speed of construction.

Sitting between the Stadium and the Aquatics Centre, the ArcelorMittal Orbit will be a beacon of the Olympic Park during the Games and the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park as the area will be known after the Games.

Visitors will be able to take a trip to the top of the structure in a lift and down too if they wish, although they will be encouraged to walk down the spiral staircase, which has 455 steps and has been designed to enable the guests to experience the feeling that they are orbiting around the structure as they descend it.

After the Olympic and Paralympic Games and following a period of transformation, the Legacy Corporation will run the ArcelorMittal Orbit as a visitor attraction with ticketed viewing from the observation decks and a compelling venue for private functions. It will be able to accommodate around 5,000 visitors a day with potential to attract around one million people during its first year of operation. It will have the capacity to accommodate between 400 – 600 visitors per hour, including full wheelchair access.

Last month, the Legacy Corporation announced that the ArcelorMittal Orbit will light up East London after 250 colour spot lights were added to the sculpture. Each can be individually controlled to produce a stunning digital combination of static and animated effects including a 15 minute moving light show every evening after the Games.

Andrew Altman, Chief Executive of the London Legacy Development Corporation, said: “The ArcelorMittal Orbit will become one of London’s most spectacular visitor attractions and a stunning backdrop to the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. “Not only will it offer differing views by day and night, but it will light up the East London skyline to become a beacon of the incredible transformation of this part of East London.”

The Legacy Corporation, which will lease the ArcelorMittal Orbit to LOCOG during the Games, has said that 85% of the 50 jobs created in the venue after the Games will go to local people.

As a tier two sponsor of London 2012, ArcelorMittal has committed to funding up to £19.6 million of the £22.7 million cost of the ArcelorMittal Orbit, with the outstanding £3.1 million provided by the London Development Agency. It has been estimated that the resulting visitor attraction will generate up to £10 million of revenue per annum and create up to 50 new jobs following the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Womade c/o La Fabbrica del Vapore

Domani sera se siete nei paraggi della Fabbrica del Vapore, vi segnalo l’evento Womade, in vista della chiusura della mostra di Anish Kapoor. Qui tutte le altre info.

c/o La Fabbrica del Vapore
via Procaccini 4, Milano
dalle ore 22

Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond’s Olympic sculpture is “a grower”- The Guardian


Dezeen Wire:
The Guardian’s architecture critic Jonathan Glancey explains that the much-criticised ArcelorMittal Orbit sculpture, designed by Anish Kapoor and structural engineer Cecil Balmond for next year’s Olympics in London, has been an easy target for jokes but that it demonstrates Britain’s manufacturing capabilities and says it “may even effect buildings of the future just as the Eiffel Tower and the Crystal Palace did” - The Guardian

Ark Nova by Arata Isozaki and Anish Kapoor

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki

Here are some images of an inflatable concert hall designed by architect Arata Isozaki and artist Anish Kapoor to tour parts of Japan affected by the earthquake and tsunami earlier this year.

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki

Once complete, the mobile Ark Nova pavilion will stage music and dance performances for victims of the disaster.

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki

The red stretchy skin of the hall is modelled on Kapoor’s orb-like Leviathan sculptures, which we featured on Dezeen back in June.

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki

The venue will seat between 500 and 700 spectators and is designed to enable quick erection and dismantling.

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki

The Lucerne Festival in Switzerland initiated the project, alongside music management agency Kajimoto.

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki

Other disaster relief projects in Japan include temporary homes in shipping containerssee all our stories about helping Japan’s recovery here.

Here’s some more details about the project from the organisers:


Ark Nova – A Tribute to Higashi Nihon

A mobile concert hall for the devastated regions in Japan

Using music to bring hope and promise to those who are suffering from the tragic major earthquake in Japan on March 11, 2011: this is the idea and goal of a special project entitled “ARK NOVA – A Tribute to Higashi Nihon.”

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki

The star architect Arata Isozaki, working together with the Indian-born British artist Anish Kapoor, is developing a mobile concert hall in which, starting in the spring of 2012, works of high artistic quality will be presented in various locations throughout the devastated region. The project was initiated by the LUCERNE FESTIVAL along with the Japanese concert and artist management agency Kajimoto.

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki

A devastating earthquake and tsunami struck the Higashi-Nihon region of northern Japan on March 11, 2011. Much has already been accomplished thanks to extensive national and international assistance, and reconstruction is in full swing. Of course, the people in the region are still suffering from the direct and indirect consequences of this tragic catastrophe and are mourning the loss of family and friends. A project by the name of “ARK NOVA – A Tribute to Higashi Nihon” has the goal of bringing new hope and promise to the people in this region through music and art.

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki

Under the direction of Arata Isozaki, one of the world’s most sought-after architects, a mobile concert hall is being built, one that can be transported to various locations in the devastated region. The multi- component design includes a hall with seating for between 500 to 700 spectators. The inflatable shell is made of an elastic material that allows quick erection and dismantling. Isozaki is working on this project in close collaboration with the Indian-born British sculptor Anish Kapoor, who is responsible for the design of the building’s shell. Kapoor’s inflatable sculpture “Leviathan” displayed at this year’s Monumenta is serving as a model for the project. Yasuhisa Toyota from Nagata Acoustics is responsible for the hall’s acoustic design, and David Staples from Theatre Projects in London is acting as the specialist theatre consultant.

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki

The hall will be called ARK NOVA and provide an absolutely unique platform for performances and appearances encompassing classical music, jazz, dance, multimedia and interdisciplinary artistic projects by leading artists and ensembles from around the world. An artistic committee with renowned personalities associated with the LUCERNE FESTIVAL will support the program planning. The performances are intended to be supported by sponsors and supporters in order to provide the population of the region with free access to the programs being presented.

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki


See also:

.

Spaziale Series
by Lanzavecchia + Wai
Zenith music hall
by Fuksas
Head-in by Magma
Architecture

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

Following our previous story about a labia-like staircase, these images by French photographer Stefan Tuchila illustrate the womb-like orbs created by artist Anish Kapoor in the Grand Palais, Paris.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

Formed of three 35 metre-high interconnected balloons, the Leviathan sculpture has a dark purple skin and a translucent red interior.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

From inside, the silhouette of the palace ceiling is visible through the bulbous red rubber.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

The sculpture was designed for the fourth Monumenta exhibition, which closes imminently.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

See our earlier story on the ArcelorMittal Orbit by Anish Kapoor »

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

See more images of this project on the photographer’s website.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

The following information is from the press release:


MONUMENTA 2011
Anish Kapoor at the Grand Palais
Leviathan from 11th May to 23rd June 2011

Each year MONUMENTA invites an internationally-renowned artist to turn their vision to the vast Nave of Paris’ Grand Palais and to create a new artwork especially for this space. MONUMENTA is an artistic interaction on an unparalleled scale, filling 13,500m2 and a height of 35m.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

The first three MONUMENTA exhibitions were hugely successful, drawing in 150,000 visitors over five weeks. In 2007, the first challenge was met by German artist Anselm Kiefer, who resides in France, followed by American artist Richard Serra in 2008 and French artist Christian Boltanski in 2010.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

For its fourth incarnation, the French Ministry for Culture and Communication has invited Anish Kapoor, one of his generation’s greatest artists, to produce a new work for the Nave’s monumental space, from 11th May to 23rd June 2011.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

Thirty years after his first exhibition in Paris, MONUMENTA marks Anish Kapoor’s return to the French capital. He is considered as one of the most important sculptors of our time. His work has profoundly enlarged the scope of contemporary sculpture, as much by his mastery of monumental scale as by the colourful sensuality and apparent simplicity emanating from his works. All this contributes to the fascination they hold for the public at large, as demonstrated, for example, by the popular success of Cloud Gate in Chicago.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

Born in Bombay in 1954, he has lived in London since the 1970s. His work rapidly gained international recognition and has been awarded numerous prizes, including the famous Turner Prize, which he won in 1991. His career has been the subject of a number of solo exhibitions at the world’s most prestigious museums, including the Louvre, the Royal Academy, Tate Modern, etc. Recently, he has been commissioned to design the key landmark for the forthcoming Olympic Games in London: a 116-metre-high sculpture entitled « Orbit ».

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

The artist describes the work he is creating for MONUMENTA as follows: “A single object, a single form, a single colour.” “My ambition”, he adds, “is to create a space within a space that responds to the height and luminosity of the Nave at the Grand Palais.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

Visitors will be invited to walk inside the work, to immerse themselves in colour, and it will, I hope, be a contemplative and poetic experience.”

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

Designed using the most advanced technologies, the work will not merely speak to us visually, but will lead the visitor on a journey of total sensorial and mental discovery.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

A technical, poetic challenge unparalleled in the history of sculpture, this work questions what we think we know about art, our body, our most intimate experiences and our origins.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

Spectacular and profound, it responds to what the artist considers to be the crux of his work: namely, “To manage, through strictly physical means, to offer a completely new emotional and philosophical experience.”

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

The awe-inspiring strength of Anish Kapoor’s work is a fertile ground that favours the democratization of the access to contemporary art.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

Through this series and subsequent exhibitions, the French Ministry for Culture and Communication hopes to appeal to the widest possible audiences.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

To exceed the visitor’s expectations, artistic educators, whose knowledge and teaching abilities multiply the possibilities to access and understand the artwork, will be on hand throughout the exhibition to talk to visitors, widening their understanding of contemporary art at no extra cost.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

School groups will have their own special programme developed in collaboration with the French Ministry for National Education.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

Multidisciplinary and fun, the programme is designed for young visitors, ranging from nursery school to high school, one highlight being dance workshops in partnership with the Théâtre National de Chaillot.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

There will be learning activities on the internet, making it possible to link the artist’s work to school programmes.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

Themed cross-generational tours will also create a link with Anish Kapoor’s creation.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

In addition, tours for the disabled will be available, in order to facilitate access to today’s heritage.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

Finally, throughout the exhibition, an events programme will propose a dialogue between word, music, dance and Anish Kapoor’s work and the creations it shelters, in order to uncover new aspects of his creation.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

Jean de Loisy is curator of Monumenta 2011. Independent exhibition curator, he has held among other positions that of creation inspector for the French Ministry for Culture and Communication, Cartier Foundation curator and curator at the Georges Pompidou Centre. He has directed and co-directed a variety of art centres in France. He has organized numerous solo artist exhibitions and memorable exhibitions such as “La Beauté” in Avignon in 2000, or “Traces du sacré” in 2008 at the Pompidou Centre. He has been working for 30 years with Anish Kapoor, for whom he organized numerous exhibitions including the 2009 retrospective at London’s Royal Academy of Arts.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

The MONUMENTA admission price is 5 Euros, with concessions 2.50 Euros. The cultural programme (free with admission) proposes concerts, performances, readings and ‘encounters’ in connection with Anish Kapoor’s artwork. A bi-lingual highly documented website will help visitors to prepare their visit.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

A fully illustrated album, co-published by the CNAP and the Rmn-GP publishing services, Paris 2011, and monograph, co-published by Flammarion and the CNAP, will be published in connection with this event.

Leviathan by Anish Kapoor

Organised by the French Ministry for Culture and Communication, the exhibition is co-produced by the Centre national des arts plastiques (CNAP) and the Etablissement public de la Réunion des musées nationaux et du Grand Palais des Champs-Elysées (Rmn-GP).


See also:

.

Queens Museum of Art
by Elliot White
Metropol Parasol
by J. Mayer H.
Nissan Y150 Dream Front
by Torafu Architects

Anish Kapoor – Monumenta

L’artiste Anish Kapoor a créé une structure impressionnante dans le cadre de Monumenta : une oeuvre inédite à l’intérieur de la Nef du Grand Palais. Voici une sélection de photographies par Franck Bohbot, ainsi qu’une vidéo produite par Fubiz illustrant le service Monumenta / UrbanDive.



monumenta6

monumenta4

monumenta7

monumenta5

monumenta3








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ArcelorMittal Orbit by Anish Kapoor

Artist Anish Kapoor has won a commission to design a 115m high public artwork at Olympic Park in London, to be built as part of London’s Olympic Games in 2012. (more…)