Sebastian Cox uses coppiced wood to create Underwood furniture collection

London Design Festival 2014: designer Sebastian Cox has unveiled his latest collection of furniture made from hazel wood he collects in the British countryside (+ slideshow).

Hewn stool by Sebastian Cox
Hewn Stool

Cox‘s Underwood collection is made from British ash and coppiced hazel wood – young tree stems that are cut down as part of a traditional method of woodland management that are usually considered a waste material.



Hazel picture hanger by Sebastian Cox
Hazel Picture Hanger

The coppiced hazel is sourced from land owned by the designer in Kent, south England.

Hewn bench by Sebastian Cox
Hewn Bench

“I am a self confessed wood geek and I adore all species but hazel is my secret favourite,” said Cox. “Hazel is at the heart of this collection. It’s in the round. It’s strong and lightweight.”

Hewn tea table by Sebastian Cox
Hewn Tea Table

Eight core pieces make up the collection. The Hewn Bench features a rectangular flat top made from ash, with four coppiced hazel legs that finish in a point and retain the majority of their bark to contrast with the smooth finished surface of the seat. A matching stool replicates the design with a smaller square top.

Hewn three legged trestle by Sebastian Cox
Hewn Trestle

The Hewn Tea Table follows a similar principle, with roughly finished legs that cross over on a pivot in the middle so they can be folded flat. A round piece of dowel holds the legs together and a string across the top of each pair prevents them from unfolding too far. The two sets of legs are connected using bars of solid stripped ash. When unfolded, the structure supports a removable butler’s tray-style top with collapsible handles.

Hewn three legged trestle by Sebastian Cox
Hewn Trestle

Three pieces of roughly finished coppiced wood create the legs for the Hewn Trestle, connected by a thick plank of wood shaped like a squashed hexagon.

Mop Stick Ladder by Sebastian Cox
Mopstick Ladder

The Mopstick Ladder is designed for hanging towels and fabrics, and uses raw coppiced wood instead of rungs. Strips of smooth ash run up each side, with slanted sections cut away from one side towards the top to allow the structure to lean securely against a wall.

Slotted shelves by Sebastian Cox
Slotted Shelves

Slotted Shelves are made from solid beams of wood that have been partially sanded to reveal the grain of the material and partly left raw with strips of bark remaining in pace. Portions of the beam have been carved away to created an indent with the flat bottom for displaying objects.

Crown candelabra by Sebastian Cox
Crown Candelabra

The Crown Candelabra is a candle holder made from a thick circular base of ash, with a series of smooth craters carved into its surface. Each of these indents hosts a candle stick made of twigs of coppiced hazel, with the tops left rough and a place for each candle carved into the the top. The spaces for the candles are lined with a brass-coloured metal.

Pegs by Sebastian Cox
Pegs

A simple set of seven pegs on a hazel wood backboard and a picture frame made of two unconnected strips of wood that can be used to suspend a picture between them complete the collection.

Cox debuted the collection at TENT London last week as part of the London Design Festival.

The post Sebastian Cox uses coppiced wood to
create Underwood furniture collection
appeared first on Dezeen.

Wicked Fabrics

Bloesem Living | Toffe Stoffen, a new label by Dutch designer Mirjam Verhulst

We are so glad to have Christine (she used to regularly contribute beautiful quickstart posts on Bloesem) back just for today to with this wicked post!

It’s been a while since my last post on Bloesem, but this lovely new brand i had to share with you! Last week Dutch designer Mirjam Verhulst launched her new label Toffe Stoffen (Dutch for Wicked Fabrics). Elegant tea towels, bold cushions cases and Mix ‘n Match fabrics to upholster your vintage design stool and make it your very own. A graphic stripe pattern all tangled up, disturbed and annoyed.. just love how she chose those names! :) Contemporary trend colors like soft grey, dusky green, bright yellow and black & white. Have a look at her pretty website.. i know you’ll love it too! x Christine – House of C 

Bloesem Living | Toffe Stoffen, a new label by Dutch designer Mirjam Verhulst

Bloesem Living | Toffe Stoffen, a new label by Dutch designer Mirjam Verhulst

Bloesem Living | Toffe Stoffen, a new label by Dutch designer Mirjam Verhulst

Bloesem Living | Toffe Stoffen, a new label by Dutch designer Mirjam Verhulst

Bloesem Living | Toffe Stoffen, a new label by Dutch designer Mirjam Verhulst

Bloesem Living | Toffe Stoffen, a new label by Dutch designer Mirjam Verhulst

 .. Toffe Stoffen

Ice Cream Sculptures

Sarah Illenberger est une artiste allemande qui transforme avec talent des matériaux ordinaires en objets inattendus. Ici, elle joue avec des crèmes glacées en les transformant en montgolfière et même en paon. L’une de ses créations fait d’ailleurs étrangement penser à la cathédrale de la place rouge à Moscou. Une série gourmande et colorée à découvrir en images.

Ice Cream Sculptures
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Henley Halebrown Rorrison uses timber and brick for London's first co-housing development

Untreated timber and pale bricks have been used to clad six new London homes by Henley Halebrown Rorrison, which were developed as the city’s first co-housing project (+ slideshow).

Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison

London studio Henley Halebrown Rorrison designed 1-6 Copper Lane for a group who pooled money together to build six individual houses with shared communal spaces.

Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison

“This project is not about creating ideal bespoke houses for six individual clients, but making a collective whole that is bigger than the sum of its parts,” said architect Ken Rorrison.

Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison

The project started in 2008, when two of the homeowners spotted a disused 1,000-square-metre plot in their local area for sale. They then asked others to join them, and formed a limited company to buy the land, which came without planning permission.

Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison

“The project would not have been commercially viable at the scale we were doing it for a developer,” said Simon Bayly of the Copper Lane Group – the company formed to buy the land.



“[It was] a risk-laden and time-consuming activity: buying land without planning permission; taking a minimum of three years from start to finish; many unknowns along the way. That is why a developer would want a significantly denser level of housing.”

Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison

The scheme comprises four three-storey houses and two two-storey houses, which are arranged around a central courtyard on the upper-ground floor, and shared facilities beneath it on the lower-ground floor.

The main aspect of each home, however, is towards gardens at the perimeter of the site, in order to give the owners more privacy.

Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison

“We were looking for a way to retain our own self-contained living spaces, combined with a number of indoor and outdoor spaces which would encourage different forms of interaction
 – sharing a meal, planting a vegetable patch, a chat over the washing machines,” said Cressida Hubbard of Copper Lane Group.

Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison

The two-storey houses have pale-grey brick walls, while the four three-storey houses are clad in untreated vertical timber boards, which will age to a silvery-grey colour over time.

Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison

On the facades facing the central courtyard, wider boards of timber have been used and battens have been placed on top, which create shadows and offer a more tactile surface for the shared areas.

Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison

Inside, the architects used a palette of simple, robust, contemporary materials, including Douglas fir for the flooring, fitted furniture, and staircases.

Low-level horizontal slot windows have also been added to bring in more daylight, without compromising the privacy of other homes.

Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison

To reduce the environmental impact of the development, waste material from demolition was recycled, some greenery was added to the roofs, and solar thermal panels were installed to provide hot water.

Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison

The architects now hope that the development will encourage more co-housing projects that offer affordable, spacious and neighbourly places to live.

Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison

“The need for new housing that is affordable in this country is at a critical stage,” said architect Simon Henley.

“Architects can have a fundamental role in creating accommodation that responds to new ways of life. In major cities, like London, financial pressures affect how people think about space, but recent phenomena like working from home and the need to reconnect communities have created a call for new housing types.”

Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison

Photography is by Ioana Marinescu.


Project credits:

Architects: Henley Halebrown Rorrison/ HHbR
Project Architect: Neil Rodgers
Design Team: Simon Henley, Gavin Hale-Brown, Ken Rorrison, Claire Lutzow
Structural Engineers: Rodrigues Associates
M&E consultant: AJ Energy
Quantity surveyor: MPA ltd
Planning consultant: CMA Planning
Main contractor: Sandwood Construction

Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison
Lower ground floor plan – click for larger image
Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison
Upper ground floor plan – click for larger image
Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison
First floor plan – click for larger image
Copper Lane Housing Co-operative by Henley Halebrown Rorrison
Section – click for larger image

The post Henley Halebrown Rorrison uses timber and brick
for London’s first co-housing development
appeared first on Dezeen.

Y-40,  the deepest swimming  pool in the world

The Y-40 is ‘the world’s deepest swimming pool’ located at Montegrotto..(Read…)

The Onion's iPhone 6 vs Galaxy S5

The Onion’s hilarious comparison: iPhone 6 vs Galaxy S5…(Read…)

Silver Oak Cellars Limited Edition

Le designer Ryan Anthony Wolper a créé une boite en chêne pour les cavistes Silver Oak basés aux Etats-Unis. La boite rassemble des échantillons de vins avec un verre gris plein de texture et la typographie a été brûlée dans le bois et coupé au laser. Les boites contiennent des Cabernet Sauvignon provenant de l’Alexander Valley et de la Napa Valley. Disponible en édition limitée.

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David Adjaye creates Stool 7 for new online design platform Standseven

StandSeven Stool 7 by David Adjaye

London Design Festival 2014: design website Standseven has launched its first limited-edition product this week with a stool shaped like the number seven by London architect David Adjaye (+ interview).

David Adjaye‘s Stool 7 is welded from recycled metal into a seven-shaped profile, with a solid flat seat and two angled legs.



A thin footrest is titled in the opposite direction to the legs, looping around the elements and resting on the floor to provide support. The seat has been created as a limited edition of 40 pieces.

The stool is the first exclusive product to be launched by Standseven – a new online design destination that is working with artists, designers and architects to make limited-edition pieces that in some way create educational or employment opportunities.

StandSeven Stool 7 by David Adjaye

“We wanted to launch the website with a product and a collaboration that really explained that we’re a bridge between high-end design and off-the-grid communities,” said Tamaryn White, who founded the company with Ikena Carreira. “David’s work really gets that message across.”

Every stool sold by Standseven will pay for one child’s fees at a school in Sierra Leone’s Kono diamond district, run by Shine On Sierra Leone.

“I strongly believe that design/aesthetics and positive social or ethical impact do not need to be mutually exclusive,” White told Dezeen. “We offer our customers the opportunity to buy fantastic, beautiful products for their home and lifestyle, that not only are ‘no harm’ but that also do a positive good.”

StandSeven Stool 7 by David Adjaye

The stool and website were officially launched earlier this week as part of the London Design Festival, during an event at The Club at Café Royal.

The launch party was hosted by the founders, Adjaye and designer Ross Lovegrove, who has designed a shell-shaped candleholder for the brand that will be made by a group of women artisans in Rwanda.

“Ross has been a great supporter of Standseven from the beginning,” said White. “He believes in the business.”

Read our interview with Tamaryn White below:


Dan Howarth: ​What is Standseven?

Tamaryn White: Standseven is online destination that offers high end design products that have a social or ethical impact. We work with prestigious artists, designers and architects to produce exclusive, limited-edition products that have a social impact, creating educational or employment opportunities. We also work with artisans in off-the-grid communities around the world that have beautiful products that are ethical, incorporating them into an international supply chain.

StandSeven Stool 7 by David Adjaye

Dan Howarth: Why did you set up the business?

Tamaryn White: We really believe that design can change the world. We spotted an opportunity to work with communities in off-the-grid locations all over the world by providing them a route to market, through a for-profit business model that creates sustainable employment and growth. This way, lasting change is possible. Can selling a table or a necklace really make a difference? Well, yes it can actually. One of our suppliers has changed the lives of people in its community, by lifting them out of the ‘poverty’ of earning $4 to earning $28 a day. This means the difference of being able to eat properly, buy a home and send their children to school. This is not some unattainable sum, it is a practical and measurable way to include human dignity into consumerism.

Dan Howarth: What makes you different from other design companies?

Tamaryn White: Everything that we do. I strongly believe that design and aesthetics, and positive social or ethical impact do not need need to be mutually exclusive. We offer our customers the opportunity to buy fantastic, beautiful products for their home and lifestyle, that not only are ‘no harm’ but that also do a positive good. You can shop and feel good at the same time. We also offer the opportunity for complete transparency on our products, by clearly labelling with our own ethical standards. We also tell the story behind the products, about the incredible people, artisans and designers that work so diligently through original videos on the suppliers and original copy.

StandSeven Stool 7 by David Adjaye

Dan Howarth: How did the Adjaye collaboration come about?

Tamaryn White: We wanted to launch the website with a product and a collaboration that really explained that we’re a bridge between high-end design and off-the-grid communities. David’s work really gets that message across. It has a powerful integrity – it’s innovative in both aesthetic and technology. He works at the community level and with artists and designers and of course his work is very international, with a very strong presence in Africa.

Dan Howarth: How did Ross Lovegrove get involved?

Tamaryn White: Ross has been a great supporter of Standseven from the beginning. He believes in the business, he believes in the team and he is excited to produce an exclusive product for Standseven. We will be working with a group of artisan women in Rwanda to produce the candle insert for the candle holder.

Dan Howarth: Are you doing any more collaborations like this in the future?

Tamaryn White: Yes of course. We are working on a few collaborations at the moment that are very high level, however they are under wraps as they are still in development phase.

The post David Adjaye creates Stool 7 for new
online design platform Standseven
appeared first on Dezeen.

Growing Books

Le concept Growing Books a été créé par deux australiens qui ont décidé de donner une nouvelle vie aux vieux livres abimés. Des cactus et autres plantes prennent place au coeur de livres à la couverture dure, totalement protégés de l’humidité de l’arrosage. Une belle manière de rendre esthétique un livre qui était destiné à être jeté.

Making Of :

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A year ago on Unclutterer

2012

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  • Unitasker Wednesday: Elegant Baby Cup
    At $160, this Elegant Baby Cup signals to all the other babies that your baby knows how to live it up and fine dine with the mucky muck. Even though your baby can’t hold up its head or find its mouth with regular consistency, pay no mind.

2011

2009

Post written by PJ Doland

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