New Pinterest board: architecture for death

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Before heading out in your spooky costume, check out our selection of Halloween treats including the best cemetery, mausoleum and crematorium architecture from the pages of Dezeen.

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Mutant Molds

The project Mutant Molds is an experience done with a semi-industrial technique and the main goal is to explore creative factors, such as fortuity, im..

Dead Man's Party

The League of S.T.E.A.M. travels south of the border to investigate a Dia de los Muertos fiesta of..(Read…)

The Clip Button

Murphy’s Law – just when you are late for office, that dang loose button on the shirt will fall off. For such emergency situations and for the likes of me – who simply hate mending – we have here the Clip Button. A clip-on shirt button design that makes mending very easy. Practical and a must-have for all single-tons!

Designers: Yeon Hee Jung & Kyung Soo Kim

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Yanko Design
Timeless Designs – Explore wonderful concepts from around the world!
Shop CKIE – We are more than just concepts. See what’s hot at the CKIE store by Yanko Design!
(The Clip Button was originally posted on Yanko Design)

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Redefining Washing

Designed for the single folks and those with a space crunch, the 3 in 1 Washer is an innovation that we could do with. It integrates the functions of a washing machine, washbasin and hand-laundry. The idea is to make the most of the limited space with a functional solution.

Designers: Students of Cheongju University

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Yanko Design
Timeless Designs – Explore wonderful concepts from around the world!
Shop CKIE – We are more than just concepts. See what’s hot at the CKIE store by Yanko Design!
(Redefining Washing was originally posted on Yanko Design)

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  2. Washing with Air
  3. My Very Own Washing Drum



Istanbul Design Biennial returns for second instalment

Bioaerosol Microtrapping Biofilm by Daisy Ginsberg

Dezeen promotion: the second edition of Istanbul Design Biennial will open in Turkey tomorrow with a series of exhibitions, panel discussions and design tours of the city.

Organised by the Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts, the city-wide design festival takes place from 1 November to 14 December 2014 and is curated by British writer Zoë Ryan under a theme titled The Future Is Not What It Used To Be.

Formafantasma, Botanica, by Simone Farresin and Andrea Trimarchi, appearing at Galata Greek School – photo by Luisa Zanzani
Formafantasma, Botanica, by Simone Farresin and Andrea Trimarchi, appearing at Galata Greek School – photo by Luisa Zanzani. Main image: Mobile Bioremediating Device, Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg showing at Galata Greek School. Photo by Tommaso Lanza and Tom Mawby

To launch the biennial, Ryan will host an informal talk today between 2pm and 4pm on the future of manifestos, with designers and industry experts, including British design academic Fiona Raby.

The centre of the festival will be at Galata Greek Primary School where five floors will be taken over by 53 projects that address and discuss the future of design.

Projects will be arranged into five categories – Personal, Norms and Standards, Resource, Civic Relations, and Broadcast – and will be set in an exhibition space designed by Istanbul-based studio Superpool and Project Projects from the US.

BLESS: N°41_Workoutcomputer by Desiree Heiss and Ines Kaag, appearing at Galata Greek School – photo by BLESS
BLESS: N°41_Workoutcomputer by Desiree Heiss and Ines Kaag, appearing at Galata Greek School – photo by BLESS

In addition to the exhibition, Galata Greek Primary School will host a series of design events including seminarsfilm screenings and a special programme for children and young people.

A group of 33 universities from across Turkey will present The Academy Programme, which will feature a total of 72 projects as well as workshops, exhibitions and panels.

Paper radio by Coralie Gourgechon appearing at Galata Greek School – photo by ISDAT Galata Greek School
Paper radio by Coralie Gourgechon appearing at Galata Greek School – photo by ISDAT Galata Greek School

Curators of this year’s festival have also organised five design walks around Istanbul that take in some of the city’s leading studios, stores and manufacturers, starting daily at 11am from Çemberlitaş in Istanbul.

The second Istanbul Design Biennial is co-sponsored by Arçelik, Doğuş Group & Bilgili Holding, Enka Foundation and VitrA and is free for all to attend.

www.tasarimbienali.iksv.org

Here is more information from the organiser:


The second Istanbul Design Biennial The Future Is Not What It Used To Be organised by the Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts (İKSV) and curated by Zoë Ryan opens to the public on 1 November. Throughout the city and in the biennial hub, Galata Greek Primary School, the biennial features 53 projects from designers all over the world that ask: “What is the future now?” as well as panels, conversations, workshops, film screenings and many other events until 14 December 2014.

 Traditional Wooden Moulds by AVM Tasha Marks, appearing at Galata Greek School – photo by Tasha Marks
Traditional Wooden Moulds by AVM Tasha Marks, appearing at Galata Greek School – photo by Tasha Marks

By rethinking the manifesto as a platform to frame pertinent questions, the projects question the role of design, its relationship to society, and its ability to be an active agent for change. The second Istanbul Design Biennial is co-sponsored by Arçelik, Doğuş Group & Bilgili Holding, ENKA Foundation and VitrA and it is held free of charge.

The biennial was launched with a media conference held on Thursday 30 October at Galata Greek Primary School with the participation of İKSV General Manager Görgün Taner, Director of Istanbul Design Biennial Deniz Ova and curator Ryan.

Ryan says Istanbul has a thriving creative community, so it seems an especially appropriate city in which to reflect on the field of design. In an effort to contribute to an already rich dialogue in Turkey and focus on issues urgently affecting daily life, the biennial brings together diverse design ideas from across the world for an emerging set of conditions.

“The 2014 Istanbul Design Biennial is envisioned as a conversation starter, Ryan said. “It is an occasion to present a range of projects by some of the most inventive practitioners working today, and emphasise the critical role that design plays in identifying points of urgency and posing questions about the objects, buildings, and environments we interact with daily, as well as materialising outcomes.”

The conference was followed by the exhibition tour guided by Ryan and associate curator Meredith Carruthers. After the tour, The second Istanbul Design Biennial Academy Programme Exhibitions and other events were visited at the biennial’s event space, Antrepo 7.

This image: Tripod by Bartosz Mucha appearing at Polska In Between. Photo by Culture.pl Antrepo no7– top image: Mobile Bioremediating Device, Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg showing at Galata Greek School. Photo by Tommaso Lanza and Tom Mawby
This image: Tripod by Bartosz Mucha appearing at Polska In Between. Photo by Culture.pl Antrepo no7

The biennial hub at Galata Greek Primary School

The exhibition at the second Istanbul Design Biennial hub, Galata Greek Primary School continues over all five floors of the school, an area of approximately 2,300 square metres. The projects imagine new possibilities that can transform the present and invite new potential futures.

The biennial features 53 projects by more than 200 designers from more than 20 countries including Australia, China, France, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Turkey and the United States, that propose alternative manifestos in the form of objects, fashion accessories, food, menus, maps, buildings, visual languages, systems, and services.

An additional project, The Exhibition as Manifesto, is a survey of the history of design exhibitions through the lens of thirteen historic shows. Compiled by the curators in collaboration with researcher Maggie Taft, these seminal group and thematic exhibitions dating from 1956 to 2007 were selected for their continued relevance and resonance in the design field.

In addition to the exhibition, the biennial hub at the Galata Greek Primary School hosts different events for design enthusiasts daily for six weeks: the Kontraakt team’s broadcast programming, which includes a weekly radio show, is held on Tuesdays and throughout the week, Q&A sessions and panels on Wednesdays, film screenings on Thursdays, and Children and Youth Programmes every day.

GOTWOB by Begüm Çelik & Berk Şimşek appearing at Galata Greek School
GOTWOB by Begüm Çelik & Berk Şimşek appearing at Galata Greek School

 Events at the second Istanbul Design Biennial

The Istanbul Design Biennial event space Antrepo 7 hosts the biennial’s Academy Programme as well as other exhibitions, seminars, conversations and workshops during six weeks. The biennial will spread over the city with its Design Walks, How To Do Too Kadıköy Project and film screenings. More information about the programme is available at tasarımbienali.iksv.org

The Academy Programme featuring 72 projects organised by over 33 academic institutions from Istanbul, Ankara, Izmir, Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, Europe and the United States to reveal different aspects of the biennial theme, can be viewed at university campuses and at Antrepo 7, from 1 November to 14 December. Antrepo 7, located in Salıpazarı Harbour is open to the public for the first time as the second Istanbul Design Biennial Event space.

A digital platform has been created as a long term archive for the university projects participating in the Istanbul Design Biennial. Under the sponsorship of Polimeks Holding, the Academy Programme Platform (tasarimbienali.iksv.org/akademiprogrami) also has an awards scheme for the projects that receive the highest amount of viewer traffic on the platform.

Within the scope of the Istanbul Design Biennial, the exhibition Polska In Between is organised in collaboration with Culture.pl, the flagship brand of the Adam Mickiewicz Institute in Warsaw, in honour of 600 years of Polish-Turkish diplomatic relations. Polska in between is an extensive presentation of contemporary Polish design, including product, graphic design, design thinking, public space, food design, design for children, as well as conceptual work. The fruits of the diverse design workshops, lectures, exhibitions, artist residencies, panel discussions and projects will be shown at Antrepo 7.

Christmas Tree by Agnieszka Wilczuk, appearing at Polska In Between – photo by Culture.pl  Antrepo no7
Christmas Tree by Agnieszka Wilczuk, appearing at Polska In Between – photo by Culture.pl Antrepo no7

More programmes and workshops will also be held by Arçelik, Türk Tuborg A.Ş. and VitrA in Antrepo 7. Design Walks, comprised of visits to design studios, stores, manufacturers, and noted buildings in six neighbourhoods and six thematic walks on Istanbul’s Asian and European sides to examine the textures of the city and observe traditional crafts are organised throughout the biennial.

Building on themes of dialogue and exchange in the biennial, the Talk to Us Panels and Designers in Dialogue Conversations gather together curators, critics and designers to explore new potentials for the design manifesto in the 21st

Century and ask critical questions about our shared future, now. The panels and conversations are sponsored by VitrA and held free of charge.

The Film Programme held in Galata Greek Primary School and TAK Kadıköy throughout the biennial, presents different approaches to living in the future.

How To Do Too Kadıköy is a collaborative action initiated as part of the biennial. Building on the experience and expertise of both 72 Hour Urban Action (72 HUA) and Tasarım Atölyesi Kadıköy (TAK; Design Atelier Kadiköy), an open call to designers has resulted in the creation of five urban furniture for five meeting points of Istanbul’s Kadıköy neighbourhood.

The furniture will be constructed with the residents by using recycling materials on Saturday, 1 November and Sunday, 2 November. The event will be held at 9am in TAK Kadıköy, at 12pm at Kadıköy pier, at 3pm at Kadıköy Altıyol Square on Saturday 1 November; and at 9am in Moda Çay Bahçesi (Moda Tea Garden) and 12pm in Moda shore on Sunday, 2 November.

The images and video recordings showing the prototypes and design process will be on display in the second Istanbul Design Biennial Exhibition in Galata Greek Primary School as of 11 November.

www.tasarimbienali.iksv.org

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for second instalment
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Studio Nienke Hoogvliet uses algae yarn to create Sea Me rug

Dutch Design Week 2014: this rug by Dutch designer Nienke Hoogvliet is woven from yarn made from algae to demonstrate the qualities of the natural textile (+ slideshow).

Sea Me algae rug by Studio Nienke Hoogvliet

To draw attention to this raw material, Nienke Hoogvliet knotted the algae yarn around an old fishing net to form a floor covering called Sea Me.



The yarn is created using cellulose extracted from sea algae, which is harvested from kelp seaweed in South Africa and purchased from a specialist supplier.

Sea Me algae rug by Studio Nienke Hoogvliet

The cellulose has similar properties to viscose – a chemical compound used to create synthetic textiles – but creates much softer fibres, according to Hoogvliet.

“It’s spun irregularly therefore the thread is thick in some places and thin in others,” she told Dezeen. “It has an organic look.”

Sea Me algae rug by Studio Nienke Hoogvliet

Viscose production is not environmentally friendly, so Hoogvliet hopes that the algae-based alternative could provide a suitable replacement.

Shades of green blend into one another across the surface of the shaggy rug, with sections of the netting left exposed around the edges.

Sea Me algae rug by Studio Nienke Hoogvliet

To create the gradient effect, the yarn was dipped in paint while still wrapped around a cone so the colour gradually sept through to the wound fibres underneath.

“I mixed different types of textile paint to get the perfect green,” said Hoogvliet. “After that I dyed the whole yarn cones. A natural gradient appears through the movement of paint through the cone – the outside is darker than the inside. When taken off the cone, I used this gradient to make the gradient on the rug.”

Sea Me algae rug by Studio Nienke Hoogvliet

Sea Me, which was presented at Dutch Design Week earlier this month, is Hoogvliet’s first product created through experimenting with the algae fibres.

“With this project I wanted to show what is possible with this yarn,” the designer said. “I hope many projects will follow.”

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to create Sea Me rug
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Miniature Papercut Artworks

Voici une série de sculptures en papier réalisées par l’artiste indien Parth Kothekar. Pour réaliser ces adorables animaux miniatures, l’artiste dessine les formes à la main avec un crayon et vient les découper minutieusement à l’aide d’un cuter. Un travail manuel et très précis à découvrir dans la galerie.

Miniature Papercut Artworks-9
Miniature Papercut Artworks-8
Miniature Papercut Artworks-7
Miniature Papercut Artworks-6
Miniature Papercut Artworks-5
Miniature Papercut Artworks-4
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Miniature Papercut Artworks-2
Miniature Papercut Artworks-1

Jones Snowboards' Mountain Surfer: Surf the white winter wave with this handmade, binding-less piece of equipment

Jones Snowboards' Mountain Surfer


It’s safe to say no name is as linked to backcountry snowboarding as Jeremy Jones—so much so, his name is rarely seen without “Big Mountain” preceding it. Under his eponymous brand, Jones Snowboards, he has designed and released a wide array of…

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Numen/For Use creates inhabitable "corporeal" installation with sticky tape

Lengths of transparent film and sticky tape wrap around the concrete columns of Paris gallery Palais de Tokyo to form a network of hollows and tunnels in an installation by Numen/For Use (+ slideshow).

Tape Paris by Numen / For Use

Numen/For Use created the Tape Paris installation for a group exhibition at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris. Titled Inside, the show explores both physical and psychological connotations of interior space.



Tape Paris by Numen / For Use

The Vienna-based design collective transformed the entrance hall of the gallery into an inhabitable organism-like structure using layers of sticky tape and plastic similar to cling-film. Visitors can navigate their way through the piece, which is suspended between the ceiling and floor and has a translucent “stretched biomorphic skin”.

Tape Paris by Numen / For Use

“The installation was envisaged as a site specific, parasitical structure invading an arbitrary location,” said Numen/For Use co-founder Christoph Katzler.

Tape Paris by Numen / For Use

Visitors to the exhibition can climb into the series of translucent hollows and channels strung six metres above the gallery foyer for a bodily experience.

Tape Paris by Numen / For Use

“In the moment when the audience enters the installation, what started off as a sculpture seamlessly morphs into architecture,” said Katzler, whose previous projects have included a cavernous net staircase in an Austrian gallery.

Tape Paris by Numen / For Use

The thin layers of film that make up the network flex under the weight of passing visitors, and the translucent surfaces give views from within the structure to the floor below.

Tape Paris by Numen / For Use

“The interior of the structure is supple, elastic and pliable while the form itself is statically perfect,” he said.

Tape Paris by Numen / For Use

A team used layers of conventional Scotch Tape to create the sinuous form between the concrete columns of the gallery.

Tape Paris by Numen / For Use

The tape lines were then covered inside and outside by layers of an elastic plastic sheeting to bind the structure together, forming a 50-metre-long network of cocooning passageways.

Tape Paris by Numen / For Use

“With the further layering of the tape, the figure becomes more and more corporeal as it picks up on the slow increase of the curvature,” said the designer.

Tape Paris by Numen / For Use

Tape Paris is supported by fashion brand COS and is on show at the Palais de Tokyo until January 2015.

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installation with sticky tape
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