Paper Robot Prototype

ZURI est un robot programmable fait de papier et de carton inventé par la compagnie de design allemande Zoobotics. Cette machine mobile, conçue comme un kit, peut être assemblée avec quelques outils (cutter, règle, colle et un tournevis). En plus d’un capteur de distance, le robot en papier a des servomoteurs, des servo-contrôleurs et un module Bluetooth, pouvant ainsi le piloter via un PC ou un smartphone. Encore à l’état de prototype, l’appareil est à découvrir ci-dessous.

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Black glass facade mirrors scenery at south London home by Ian McChesney

Opaque glass cladding on this south London house by Ian McChesney reflects the brick and stucco facades of neighbouring Victorian properties and foliage from a park next door (+ slideshow).

Sydenham house by Ian McChesney

Ian McChesney designed the five-bedroom home, named Tree House, for a plot of land in a conservation area in Sydenham, south-east London.



Sydenham house by Ian McChesney

The London-based architect came up against a number of planning restrictions imposed for the site, which is surrounded by a number of late Victorian properties, including a requirement to adhere to sustainable building standards. Over 68 objections were lodged against the development by local residents.

Sydenham house by Ian McChesney

“It was made clear to us by the planners at Lewisham that a ‘striking’ and high-quality design was sought for this site,” McChesney told Dezeen.

Sydenham house by Ian McChesney

In response, McChesney designed “a simplistic and crisp form” made of two conjoined volumes topped by a butterfly roof that pitches up at the edges and dips in the centre.

Sydenham house by Ian McChesney

“Given the variety of forms we decided not to mimic the existing massing but to create something obviously new,” he said.

Sydenham house by Ian McChesney

The two timber-framed volumes are clad in sections of black polished glass, favoured by the planning committee for its perceived ability to blend into the surroundings. A layer of insulation between the prefabricated wooden frame and glass facing gives the house warmth.

Sydenham house by Ian McChesney

The glossy surface reflects the facades of neighbouring houses and planting, “helping it to sit harmoniously in it’s leafy setting.”

Sydenham house by Ian McChesney

The larger of the two volumes houses the main open-plan living space of the property and a bedroom on the ground floor, while four further bedrooms are located across the upper floor.

Sydenham house by Ian McChesney

Windows with wooden frames, set neatly into the glass panelling of the lower floor, face onto the gardens.

Sydenham house by Ian McChesney

Attached to the side of living space, the second volume forms a slim windowless stairwell that creates a buffer between an adjacent property.

Sydenham house by Ian McChesney

A doorway at either end of the stairwell provides two entrance points to the building, which is positioned between two small tracks.

Sydenham house by Ian McChesney

Off the hallway there is open-plan living room and kitchen with light wooden floorboards. The kitchen is centred around an island finished in a contrasting dark-stained wood, while in the living room a wood-burning stove with a flue that rises through the ceiling.

Sydenham house by Ian McChesney

Sections of wood-framed glazing overlook the garden and a set of timber steps lead from glazed doors onto an area of raised decking.

Sydenham house by Ian McChesney

Above the living space there are four further bedrooms, and two bathrooms situated at either end of the stairwell. Panels of high-level glazing in the bedrooms sit flush with the polished glass facade and give views to the park.

Sydenham house by Ian McChesney
Site plan – click for larger image
Sydenham house by Ian McChesney
Ground floor plan – click for larger image
Sydenham house by Ian McChesney
First floor plan – click for larger image

The post Black glass facade mirrors scenery at
south London home by Ian McChesney
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Naftali Beder: I am Obsidian

By illustrator Naftali Beder.

Cat grooming bag doubles as feline gimp suit

The Cat Grooming Bag.”Two front zippers allow cleaning of front paws, as well as nail..(Read…)

Organic Structure and Textile Art

Le studio Laokoon invente des matériaux aussi esthétiques qu’ergonomiques grâce à des associations de textiles, fils et structures. De ce fait, le studio conçoit à la main des mécanismes souples rappelant parfois la morphogenèse des écailles de Tatou. Des visuels de ses différentes créations sont à découvrir dans la suite en images et vidéo.

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Design on the Rise: How Smart Design's Decision to Shutter Its SF Studio May Mark a Fundamental Shift in the Industry

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Apropos word that industry stalwart Smart Design is closing its San Francisco studio after nearly a decade and a half in the Bay Area, our Discussion Boards are abuzz about what may well be an industry-wide shift that finds its epicenter in Silicon Valley. OP jarman65 follows up to his opener with a link to a Peter Merholz blogpost unpacking the phenomenon; forumite Cyberdemon initially chimes in with the pros and cons of in-house vs. consultancy and a general shift in the industry, later concisely summing it up: “Smart and the big guys got contracts from the mega-corporations who could afford their hefty price tag, and those are the guys who now have fairly large and mature design teams internally.” Meanwhile, Surface Phil puts it bluntly:

I think it’s time to face the music that if you are an agency whose core offering is industrial design alone (i.e. designing plastic) chances are this service can be found elsewhere. Whether it be in-house design resource or outsourced overseas. You better be bringing something else to the table. UX, business innovation, commercialization strategy. Something…

Commentators also note that Smart Design recently opened a London office (after quietly dissolving a Barcelona satellite) and there is no indication that the company is in anything less than ship-shape—which is precisely why some, such as Merholz, conclude that the trend is a symptom of the ascendancy of tech companies. In short, these juggernauts are increasingly investing in design, which may spell the demise of the brand-name consultancy as we know it. That, or maybe it’s simply the case that Shoreditch is the new SoMa:

All told, it remains to be seen as to whether the shakeup at Smart Design is a Bay Area bellwether or an isolated incident. The second page of the discussion thread broadly addresses the facts, with more of the nitty-gritty from industry vets bepster, Yo, FluffyData and slippyfish; speculation though it may be, their comments speak to the dynamic—and sometimes outright political—nature of the relationship between consultancies and their clients.

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Andaz Tokyo Toranomon Hills: The design-minded hotel offers a sophisticated, luxurious stay that brings forth the best of Japanese culture

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On the 47th to 52nd floors of the new Toranomon Hills skyscraper is one of Tokyo’s newest hotels. Andaz Tokyo Toranomon Hills—the Hyatt-owned brand’s second property in Asia—is aiming for a sophisticated yet simple approach to…

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Diller and Scofidio create "mischievous" leak inside Jean Nouvel's glass gallery

American architects Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio have created an installation inside the Fondation Cartier in Paris by Jean Nouvel, adding a “leak” in the ceiling with drops of water that trigger a series of reactions across two gallery spaces (+ slideshow).

The Musings on a Glass Box installation by Diller and Scofidio at Jean Nouvel's Fondation Cartier
Photograph by Luc Boegly

The Musings on a Glass Box installation was commissioned by Cartier to celebrate the 20th anniversary of its building and the 30th anniversary of its art foundation.



Completed in 1994 and designed by French architect Jean Nouvel, the glass and steel Fondation Cartier building on Boulevard Raspail caused controversy when it opened as its transparent walls appeared to preclude the hanging of artwork.

The Musings on a Glass Box installation by Diller and Scofidio at Jean Nouvel's Fondation Cartier
Photograph by Luc Boegly

Diller and Scofidio, who together with Charles Renfro run the firm that is responsible for projects including New York’s High Line and the Broad Museum in Los Angeles, were already familiar with the space having been involved in a number of exhibitions since the opening of the the building.

The Musings on a Glass Box installation by Diller and Scofidio at Jean Nouvel's Fondation Cartier
Photograph by Luc Boegly

They wanted to pay tribute to the original architecture of the galleries by using it as a raw material for their work.

The Musings on a Glass Box installation by Diller and Scofidio at Jean Nouvel's Fondation Cartier
Photograph by Luc Boegly

“As the space is a provocation to artists and curators, so the installation is a provocation to the building,” Diller told Dezeen.

The Musings on a Glass Box installation by Diller and Scofidio at Jean Nouvel's Fondation Cartier
Photograph by Luc Boegly

“One of the obvious attributes is this transparency and how it creates a provocation to everyone using it. So our first instinct was to create a problem for that transparency and to flirt with it in a different way.”

The glass walls of the larger gallery space to the left of the main entrance are coated with a liquid crystal film that fades in and out of transparency as an electric current passes through it.

The Musings on a Glass Box installation by Diller and Scofidio at Jean Nouvel's Fondation Cartier
Photograph by Luc Boegly

“Liquid crystal film has been around probably for about twenty years or more. Generally it goes off and on. What makes this film unique is that you can control it,” explained Scofidio. “You can actually dial it down so it gradually changes to transparent, to translucent.”

“We tried to make it as invisible as possible,” added Diller.

The Musings on a Glass Box installation by Diller and Scofidio at Jean Nouvel's Fondation Cartier
Photograph by Luc Boegly

A red plastic bucket on wheels appears to be the only occupant of the room. Inside the bucket is a camera and sensors that guide its movements around the space to collect drops of water that fall from the ceiling, as if there is a leak. As each drop falls, a loud noise sounds.

“We came up with this kind of mischievous thing, this leak. Just a leak, but it’s a very smart leak with a very smart bucket that captures it,” said Diller. “The [idea of this] empty space with just one very kind of banal object that is actually doing something very smart – it grew out of that. And then we thought: okay what do we do with the sound of that drop? How do we relate it to the next space?”

The Musings on a Glass Box installation by Diller and Scofidio at Jean Nouvel's Fondation Cartier
Photograph by Luc Boegly

The smaller gallery to the right of the main entrance is occupied by a large screen that hangs parallel to the floor like a suspended ceiling, but just one metre above ground level.

To view the images being shown, visitors are invited to lie down on black loungers supported on wheels and propel themselves underneath the screen or use curved mirrors controlled using long black metal handles.

The Musings on a Glass Box installation by Diller and Scofidio at Jean Nouvel's Fondation Cartier

Once underneath, the moving image they see is a blown up version of the video footage captured by the camera in the bucket moving around in the space opposite. As each drop falls into the bucket, the surface of the water ripples, with the effect becoming amplified on the screen.

The sounds initially generated to accompany the drops of water also become distorted in the second room and choral voices are added to the acoustic arrangement, which was devised by American composer David Lang.

The Musings on a Glass Box installation by Diller and Scofidio at Jean Nouvel's Fondation Cartier

“The notion of, in one space – in the big space – doing something very tiny, almost invisible, almost nothing, and then taking that to the other space, makes it into the comic here and the sublime over there,” said Diller.

“It’s doing something that’s very ethereal in a way, but also grotesque, with that very large image and that drop becoming very forceful and the compression of watching with that very low floor-to-ceiling height.”

The Musings on a Glass Box installation by Diller and Scofidio at Jean Nouvel's Fondation Cartier
Photograph by Trevor Lamphier

Diller and Scofidio were initially best known for their installation work, becoming the focus of worldwide attention in 2002 with the Blur Building – a suspended platform over a Swiss lake that was shrouded in a “fog” of fine water mist.

Since then they have been involved with increasingly high-profile architecture projects, with their firm becoming Diller Scofidio + Renfro in 2004.

The Musings on a Glass Box installation by Diller and Scofidio at Jean Nouvel's Fondation Cartier
Photograph by Luc Boegly

“We started by doing installations in galleries and it’s only now that we are the other side of the wall,” said Scofidio.

“We never said ‘one day we’ll be doing this’ or ‘one day we’ll have a big office’. It was never our intention. We were simply doing things that interested us and using the way that architects conceive the world to investigate conditions which we generally don’t pay a lot of attention to.”

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The Dezeen guide to contemporary cemeteries

Concrete necropolis by Andrea Dragoni contains public plazas and site-specific artworks

Halloween is traditionally a day for honouring the dead, so today we’re revisiting some of the best cemetery, mausoleum and crematorium architecture on Dezeen.

The roots of Halloween, or All Hallows’ Eve, is thought to have originated from a Celtic festival dedicated to marking the beginning of winter and the end of the annual crop cycle. The day was believed to be the moment when the souls of the dead would travel to the underworld, weakening the barriers between the living and the dead.

In the modern Christian calendar it precedes All Saints Day, a day dedicated to honouring all of the dead saints. Other cultures also celebrate a day of the dead at this time of year, with cemeteries often at the heart of the celebrations and activities.

Although Christian cultures once buried their dead in the grounds of their parish church, the population explosion in cities in the 19th century brought about by the industrial revolution and subsequent overcrowding led to the creation of the designated burial areas we are more familiar with today.

These cemeteries became a focus for a new kind of monumental memorial architecture. This was particularly evident in areas of the world under the influence of the British Empire, whose architects indulged in creating highly decorative structures and covering graves and mausoleums with sculptures and carvings.

This was scaled back over the course of the 20th century, as memorial buildings reflected wider architectural trends. The construction of new cemeteries became less common and crematoria more popular as land grew in value and attitudes towards burial began to change.

Today’s contemporary cemetery structures and crematoria of note are usually built in a minimal or Modernist style, generally featuring exposed raw materials like brick, concrete stone or marble. Walls are often whitewashed and decorative elements are rare.

Here are 10 of the best examples from the pages of Dezeen:


Extension to the Gubbio necropolis, Italy, by Andrea Dragoni

Concrete necropolis by Andrea Dragoni contains public plazas and site-specific artworks

Italian architect Andrea Dragoni extended a cemetery in Gubbio by adding rows of monumental travertine walls laid out in a sequence intended to reflect the linear arrangement of the ancient Italian town at the base of Mount Igino in the Appenines.

Concrete necropolis by Andrea Dragoni contains public plazas and site-specific artworks

Public plazas and artworks are slotted in between the towering stone walls. “I wanted to reinterpret the material to emphasise the gravity of the volumes of the cemetery and their strong abstraction,” said Dragoni. Find out more about this project »


Gomes family mausoleum, Portugal, by Armazenar Ideias

Family grave house by Armazenar Ideias Arquitectos

Traditional mausoleum structures in Portugal are decorative, but Pedro Matos of Armazenar Ideias wanted to design a more modern and simplistic vault for the Gomes family, using blocks of white marble to build this cube-shaped structure for the in the city of Póvoa de Varzim

Family grave house by Armazenar Ideias Arquitectos

“There are different values to be represented in architecture now,” Matos told Dezeen. “Not so much the old solemnity and ‘baroque thinking’ associated to death, but a much more simple and essential way to interpret it, detached from the excess of symbolism.” Find out more about this project »


Sunset Chapel, Mexico, by Bunker Arquitectura

Sunset Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura

This boulder-shaped concrete building is a mourning chapel in Acapulco, Mexico, with crypts arranged around its perimeter. The chapel space is raised five metres above the ground to avoid needing to move large rocks on the site and is accessed via a set of internal steps.

Sunset Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura

“Acapulco’s hills are made up of huge granite rocks piled on top of each other,” said the architects. “In a purely mimetic endeavour, we worked hard to make the chapel look like ‘just another’ colossal boulder atop the mountain.” Find out more about this project »


New Funeral Home, Spain, by Batlle i Roig Arquitectes

New Funeral Home in Sant Joan Despí by Batlle i Riog Arquitectes

Located to the west of Barcelona in the town of Sant Joan Despí, this concrete funeral home is embedded into a hillside site with a sloping grass roof that pitches back up at the front to frame a long, narrow facade. Corten steel columns alternate with floor-to-ceiling glass to create stripes of light and shadow.

New Funeral Home in Sant Joan Despí by Batlle i Riog Arquitectes

“The materiality generated by the assortment of exposed structural element textures together with the natural light qualify and determine the atmospheres of each space, accompanying the visitors’ mourning at every turn,” said the architects. Find out more about this project »


Funeral Chapel in Ingelheim Frei-Weinheim, Germany, by Bayer & Strobel Architekten

Funeral Chapel in Ingelheim Frei-Weinheim by Bayer & Strobel Architekten

The sharply angled gable of this chapel in a small German town creates a double-height funeral hall lit by a long narrow skylight, with glass walls framing two private courtyards and stone walls to “block off” the cemetery from the street.

Funeral Chapel in Ingelheim Frei-Weinheim by Bayer & Strobel Architekten

“To do justice to its significance within the cemetery complex, the funeral is clearly marked with a gabled roof,” said architect Peter Strobel. “This creates an interior that feels dignified and solemn as well as simple and appropriate to its purpose.” Find out more about this project »


New Crematorium at Woodland Cemetery, Sweden, by Johan Celsing

The New Crematorium by Johan Celsing Arkitektkontor

Johan Celsing Arkitektkontor’s red brick design won a competition run by the city of Stockholm to create a new crematorium building inside the Woodland Cemetery originally designed by Swedish architect Eric Gunnar Asplund.

The new building sits in a clearing 150 metres from Asplund’s 1940s chapel, which can’t be modernised without making major changes to the protected structure.

The New Crematorium by Johan Celsing Arkitektkontor

Celsing’s building follows the curve of the terrain, sloping gently from its edges to a mound in the middle to make minimal impact on the woodland. Find out more about this project »


Chapel of St. Lawrence, Finland, by Avanto Architects

Chapel of St. Lawrence by Avanto Architect

Avanto Architects designed this funeral chapel in Vantaa to last for 200 years, selecting hard-wearing materials that would develop character over time. The steel and concrete structure is topped with a copper roof, which includes a continuous skylight that follows the route of a visitor attending a funeral, through the building to the graveyard of the older adjacent church.

Chapel of St. Lawrence by Avanto Architect

“The chapel’s architecture is a depiction of the passage of a Christian soul from here to the hereafter,” said the architects. “The whitewashed masonry walls and a continuous skylight next to it lead from one space to the next, from the low and dark to the lofty and light.” Find out more about this project »


Family Tomb, Portugal, by Pedro Dias

Family Tomb by Pedro Dias

Lined with stainless steel panels, this pre-fabricated family tomb occupies a plot inside a cemetery on a mountainside in Arganil and is clad in softened black granite. It has capacity for eight coffins, with the central plinth used to support coffins during ceremonies and offer a seat with views over the surrounding landscape. A cruciform aperture is cut into the roof.

Family Tomb by Pedro Dias

“The concept behind this small, rather unusual but challenging project was the creation of a simple, restrained and minimalistic architectural object that would interact directly with the impressive landscape by literally framing it,” explained Dias. Find out more about this project »


Crematorium in Kėdainiai, Lithuania, by Architektu Biuras G.Natkevicius ir Partneriai

Crematorium in Kėdainiai by Architektu Biuras

Located on an industrial site, the fortress-like concrete walls of this crematorium – one of the first public buildings of its kind in Lithuania – are punctuated by dozens of square windows that are scattered across the facade.

A cluster of windows reveals the location of a private courtyard behind the perimeter wall, which also parts in two places to create entrances.

Crematorium in Kėdainiai by Architektu Biuras

“To make a path for the first crematorium in Lithuania wasn’t easy,” said the architects. “In order to distance itself from the industrial environment the building was designed closed like a human introvert.” Find out more about this project »


Islamic Cemetery, Austria, by Bernardo Bader Architects

Islamic Cemetery by Bernardo Bader Architects

Bernardo Bader Architects used exposed red-tinted concrete for the main structure of this prayer building at an Islamic cemetery in the countryside of the Austrian state of Vorarlberg, which opens out onto a series of staggered graveyards.

The simple rectilinear building features a long rectangular window across one facade, screened by a latticed oak framework that displays one of the traditional patterns of Islamic mashrabiya screens.

Islamic Cemetery by Bernardo Bader Architects

The five rectangular graveyards are lined up at the back of the building. Each one contains several trees, benches and small patches of grass. Find out more about this project »

The post The Dezeen guide to contemporary cemeteries appeared first on Dezeen.

Windowless Plane

On a tous rêvé de s’envoler dans les airs en ayant la sensation de flotter dans les nuages. C’est presque chose faite avec l’entreprise de technologie anglaise Centre for Process Innovation et leur dernière invention le Windowless Fuselage Concept. Cette future génération d’avion prévoit de remplacer les conventionnels hublots par des écrans haute définition et flexibles permettant d’afficher la captation de caméras placées à l’extérieur de l’engin. A découvrir en vidéo.

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