Mud bricks and woven rattan used to build an affordable preschool in Morocco

Architects Nicolas Coeckelberghs and Dorian Vauzelle Mamoth collaborated with local workers in the Moroccan town of Aknaibich to construct this school building using local methods including adobe brickworking (+ slideshow).

Preschool-of-Aknaibich-by-BC-architects_dezeen_468_13

Nicolas Coeckelberghs from Brussels studio BC Studies and Dorian Vauzelle from the Mamoth Collective were invited by French organisation the GoodPlanet Foundation to oversee the creation of a single classroom that increases the capacity of an existing school, and provides a dedicated facility for preschool children.



The school is situated in the new part of the town, where most buildings are constructed from concrete.

Preschool-of-Aknaibich-by-BC-architects_dezeen_468_2

Following a workshop with members of the community, it was decided to base the new classroom building on the traditional architecture of the old town, which consists of earthen structures arranged along narrow alleys.

Preschool of Aknaibich by BC architects

“Its style could be called a new vernacular, inspired by local typologies, materials and techniques, while at the same time having a contemporary look, good bioclimatic performance and earthquake-proof design,” said the architects in a statement.

Preschool-of-Aknaibich-by-BC-architects_dezeen_468_19

The traditional building techniques employed in the project include the use of inclined foundations made from local stone, and support walls formed from sun-dried adobe bricks – a building block made from mud. These walls are finished with a render consisting of earth, straw and sand.

Preschool-of-Aknaibich-by-BC-architects_dezeen_468_11

The building’s plot dictated some of the design’s key characteristics, including the positioning of most of the windows and doors on the north facade to allow indirect sunlight to illuminate the interior.

Preschool-of-Aknaibich-by-BC-architects_dezeen_468_3

A thick south-facing wall with small and deep openings helps to minimise unwanted solar gain during the day but stores the sun’s heat and gradually releases it when needed in the evening.

Preschool of Aknaibich by BC architects

Internal walls are made from rammed earth and finished with a plaster made by combing clay and gypsum to give a smooth finish that helps to reflect light.

Preschool-of-Aknaibich-by-BC-architects_dezeen_468_21

The team also designed the landscaping of the adjacent play area, which is protected by a pergola covered with rattan that also incorporates seating so it can be used as an external classroom.

Preschool-of-Aknaibich-by-BC-architects_dezeen_468_10

Ring beams made from cement and connected by vertical bars help to reinforce the adobe brick walls and address the paraseismic issues resulting from building in this earthquake-prone region.

Preschool-of-Aknaibich-by-BC-architects_dezeen_468_15

The only wood available locally comes from eucalyptus or palm trees, which are not structurally strong, so the roof was assembled from small sections combined to create larger spans and braced with diagonal pieces.

Preschool-of-Aknaibich-by-BC-architects_dezeen_468_1

Woven rattan spread across the roof is covered with a thick layer of earth and an additional cork surface to restrict the building’s internal temperature.

Preschool-of-Aknaibich-by-BC-architects_dezeen_468_0

The methods employed in the development of the £18,000 school are intended to demonstrate the potential for integrating traditional construction alongside more modern building techniques to create affordable architecture.

Preschool-of-Aknaibich-by-BC-architects_dezeen_468_8

“By following the grid-like layout of the existing school rooms, the preschool of Aknaibich creates an interesting juxtaposition of the new vernacular next to the existing modern,” said the architects, “maybe inspiring the way forward for future constructions within the community of Aknaibich.”

Preschool-of-Aknaibich-by-BC-architects_dezeen_468_17

The project was managed on site by architect Frank Stabel and involved the participation of a group of architecture students from Belgian university KU Leuven as well as the local workers.

Photography is by Frank Stabel.


Project Credits:

Architects: BC architects + Mamoth
Local material consultancy: BC Studies + Mamoth
Community participation and organisation: BC Studies, Mamoth and the Goodplanet Foundation
Cooperation: Frank Stabel, Thomas Joos, Alina Negru, Carole Fournier and Elisabetta Carnevale
Client: Community of Aknaibich through the Goodplanet Foundation

Preschool of Aknaibich by BC architects
Floor plan – click for larger image
Preschool of Aknaibich by BC architects
Section – click for larger image

The post Mud bricks and woven rattan used to
build an affordable preschool in Morocco
appeared first on Dezeen.

Silla Linon Chair

Le designer chilien Alberto Vitelio a conçu la chaise « Silla Linon » : une chaise en bois et en barres métalliques noires qui s’entrecroisent. En s’inspirant de l’architecture du 21ème siècle, il a travaillé la structure sur l’arrangement, le lien et l’ordre des lignes noires, accentuant diverses formes polygonales.

linonchair-9
linonchair-8
linonchair-7
linonchair-5
linonchair-3
sillalinon-5
sillalinon-3
sillalinon-1
sillalinon-00
sillalinon-0

Claesson Koivisto Rune refines the Champagne glass

Stockholm studio Claesson Koivisto Rune has teamed up with a Champagne expert to design a version of the classic glass flute.

Richard Juhlin Optimum champagne glass by Claesson Koivisto Rune

Claesson Koivisto Rune worked with Swedish Champagne writer Richard Juhlin to create a glass with a taller profile and larger volume, designed to form an optimum air-liquid ratio to capture the aromas of the sparkling drink.



“To design under the strictest parameters is the hardest thing,” said the studio’s founders, Mårten Claesson, Eero Koivisto and Ola Rune. “Refining and perfecting are your only available tools. We know the champagne world is taking this design to its heart. But will the design world, hungry for visual thrills, get it?”

Richard Juhlin Optimum champagne glass by Claesson Koivisto Rune

The size and shape of the glass bowl’s upper section is designed to concentrate the scent of the champagne.

Richard Juhlin Optimum champagne glass by Claesson Koivisto Rune

The aroma is intended to rise from the liquid in the widened lower portion and collect below the rim, which is smaller in diameter than traditional flutes.

Richard Juhlin Optimum champagne glass by Claesson Koivisto Rune

The curve of the bowl, from the stem to its widest circumference, is shaped to reduce the amount of liquid volume at the bottom of the glass while maximising the proportion of the Champagne exposed to the air.

Richard Juhlin Optimum champagne glass by Claesson Koivisto Rune
Click for larger image

This allows for the maximum amount of bubbles, which carry the scent, to reach the surface “without them getting bigger and less refined”.

Richard Juhlin Optimum champagne glass by Claesson Koivisto Rune
Click for larger image

Designed to accommodate four fingers along its length, the stem is manufactured to be as thin as possible.

Richard Juhlin Optimum champagne glass by Claesson Koivisto Rune
Click for larger image

“The stem and foot act as a physical and visual counterweight to the bowl,” said the designers.

Richard Juhlin Optimum champagne glass by Claesson Koivisto Rune
Click for larger image

The glass is available with a “Juhlin line”, a thin marking around the bowl that the expert recommends as an ideal fill level.

Manufactured by Italian brand Italesse, the Richard Juhlin Optimum glass was launched at Chateau Les Crayères in France’s Champagne region earlier this week.

The post Claesson Koivisto Rune refines
the Champagne glass
appeared first on Dezeen.

Curved Chapel in Finland

Sanaksenaho Architects ont été commissionnés pour construire la St Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel en Finlande. Ils ont imaginé la chapelle en suivant une forme d’arc avec des poutres courbées qui lui donnent plus une allure de bateau que de bâtiment. Une perspective et une lumière incroyables pour une construction boisée à l’intérieur et cuivrée à l’extérieur.

Photos by Jussi Tiainen.
chapelinfinland-14
chapelinfinland-13
chapelinfinland-12
chapelinfinland-10
chapelinfinland-8
chapelinfinland-6
chapelinfinland-5
chapelinfinland-3
chapelinfinland-1bis
chapelinfinland-1

MILK CARTON INSPIRED NESTBOX / BIRDHOUSE

A truly sustainable product. We’ve been pestering local businesses for their off cuts of ply that would normally destined to the scrap bin. The ..

Electronic rock band Jape get messy in The Heart's Desire music video

Music: director Connor Finnegan used poster paint and a huge tank of water to create this surreal music video for Dublin band Jape’s single The Heart’s Desire.

The Heart's Desire music video by Conor Finnegan for Jape

Finnegan‘s video, which combines live action and animation, begins with Jape singer Richie Egan lying on his back and covered with multicoloured paint.

The Heart's Desire music video by Conor Finnegan for Jape

“We used poster paint,” Finnegan told Dezeen. “It’s really cheap to buy and is non-toxic and washes off really easily. We would just leave the camera rolling while Richie sang, then I’d squirt more paint on his face every now and then. It was great fun.”

The Heart's Desire music video by Conor Finnegan for Jape

As Egan sings the lyrics to the song, he swallows a strange, worm-like creature, which goes on a trippy underwater journey for the rest of the video.

The Heart's Desire music video by Conor Finnegan for Jape

“The line that stuck out most for me in the song was ‘allow yourself to breathe,'” Finnegan said. “So we had this idea where we’d have a eel creature that would be struggling to exist on land but when it goes inside the head it can breathe. Then it goes on a sort of a journey to the end and finally death.”

The Heart's Desire music video by Conor Finnegan for Jape

Finnegan shot the underwater scenes with a GoPro camera in an 18-foot-long home-made tank lined with rocks and plants scavenged from neighbours’ gardens. He added in the animation with motion graphics software After Effects.

The Heart's Desire music video by Conor Finnegan for Jape

“The underwater stuff was shot in a tank in my mum’s back garden,” he explained. “It was made from an old fence that had come down in a storm. I got most of the sand from a beach nearby. Then I taped a GoPro to a pole and would do a few passes, move the rocks and plants around so it looked different then I’d shoot a bit more.”

The Heart's Desire music video by Conor Finnegan for Jape

There were supposed to be real fish in the video, but the goldfish Finnegan bought and added to the tank turned out to be reluctant actors.

“You can only barely see one in the video,” he complained. “They were crap and just hid behind rocks most of the time.”

Dezeen Music Project: Jape - The Heart's Desire

The post Electronic rock band Jape get messy
in The Heart’s Desire music video
appeared first on Dezeen.

Conceptual Carpet Woven with Leather Strips

Dans le but de rassembler la famille et les voisins autour d’un même point fédérateur sans rapport avec la technologie, la designer Stéphanie Languard a conçu un tapis entièrement tissé avec des lanières en cuir et qui possède en son centre un foyer pour faire des feux. Un objet qui mêle art contemporain et art primitif à découvrir dans la suite.

TAPIS-tissé-cuir-design-Stéphanie-Langard-esad-reims-france-blog-espritdesign-5
TAPIS-tissé-cuir-design-Stéphanie-Langard-esad-reims-france-blog-espritdesign-4
TAPIS-tissé-cuir-design-Stéphanie-Langard-esad-reims-france-blog-espritdesign-3
TAPIS-tissé-cuir-design-Stéphanie-Langard-esad-reims-france-blog-espritdesign-2
TAPIS-tissé-cuir-design-Stéphanie-Langard-esad-reims-france-blog-espritdesign-1

Netzwerkarchitekten completes community centre with a zigzagging golden roof

The consecutive pitched roofs of this church community centre in Germany were designed by Netzwerkarchitekten to make the building resemble a row of terraced houses.

German studio Netzwerkarchitekten won a competition to design the St Gallus Community Centre for a church in the town of Urberach, just outside Frankfurt.

netzwerkarchitekten completes German community centre with metal-clad zigzagging roof

The 420-square-metre community hall features a row of six conjoined gables, standing in contrast with its more traditional neighbour –  a Catholic church with a steeple and white masonry.



The opaque roof volume is tiled in diamond-shaped pieces of golden metal, while the base is surrounded by transparent glazing.

netzwerkarchitekten completes German community centre with metal-clad zigzagging roof

“The basic concept for this open house design was to make the active community life visible to the outside world and to establish the new building as an important social element of the Urberach cityscape,” the architects told Dezeen, explaining how they wanted the roof structure to “seemingly hover over the ground floor”.

netzwerkarchitekten completes German community centre with metal-clad zigzagging roof

The ground floor is designed as a multi-purpose space capable of hosting a variety of events. Moveable wooden partitions separate different functions, and can be opened or closed to create flexible spaces.

“By opening the ceiling-high sliding and revolving doors, an open usable space is created encompassing the core space as well as the ancillary and sanitary facilities,” said the architects.

netzwerkarchitekten completes German community centre with metal-clad zigzagging roof

The main entrance, positioned in the centre of the building, leads into a double-height foyer with a parish hall to one side and meeting spaces, a kitchen and toilets to the other.

Floor-to-ceiling black doors are spaced out at irregular intervals along the glazed facade and can be left fully open, allowing internal activities to spill outside during summer festivals.

netzwerkarchitekten completes German community centre with metal-clad zigzagging roof

A flight of stairs to one side of the double-height atrium leads to group meeting rooms under the peaks of the roof. Rooms are lit by a series of small windows and skylights positioned off centre in the walls and ceilings.

The jagged roof structure gives a human scale to the interior of the upper floor. “Each group room has its own ‘house-in-house’ character through its own gable roof,” said the architects.

netzwerkarchitekten completes German community centre with metal-clad zigzagging roof

A large youth centre in a partial basement below the foyer has its own separate entrance. The basement level connects with the main body of the community centre via an internal staircase and lift.

Photography is by Jörg Hempel.


Project credits:

Client: Mainz Episcopal Ordinariate represented by the Catholic Parish of St. Gallus, Rödermark
Architect: Netzwerkarchitekten
Support structure: Bollinger + Grohmann
Heating, plumbing,ventilation planning: S&K Ingenieure
Fire prevention: Ingenieurbüro Braun
Project Management: Karen Willius, Petra Lenschow

Community centre in Urberach by Netzwerk Architekten
Site plan – click for larger image
Community centre in Urberach by Netzwerk Architekten
Ground floor plan – click for larger image
Community centre in Urberach by Netzwerk Architekten
First floor plan – click for larger image
Community centre in Urberach by Netzwerk Architekten
Section – click for larger image

The post Netzwerkarchitekten completes community
centre with a zigzagging golden roof
appeared first on Dezeen.

Link About It: This Week's Picks: Grannies get high, Intel's high-tech bangle, Oxford Dictionaries' word of the year and more in our weekly look at the web

Link About It: This Week's Picks

1. Aura’s Wireless Christmas Lights
With just about everything going wireless these days, the team behind Aura thought it was time Christmas tree lights got the same treatment. After becoming fed up with untangling a never-ending mess of lights each……

Continue Reading…

Fashion Basketball Kit

Spencer Nikosey est un designer industriel basé à Los Angeles. Avec son shop Killspencer, il propose aujourd’hui une version ultra fashion d’un mini panier de basket. Sont ainsi disponibles deux éditions dont l’édition spéciale qui comprend un panneau en bois d’érable, un arceau plaqué et un filet en cuir dont la jupe est faite de feuille d’or. A découvrir.

Fashion Basketball Bling_9
Fashion Basketball Bling_8
Fashion Basketball Bling_7
Fashion Basketball Bling_6
Fashion Basketball Bling_5
Fashion Basketball Bling_4
Fashion Basketball Bling_3
Fashion Basketball Bling_2
Fashion Basketball Bling_1
Fashion Basketball Bling_0