YOY brings “humour to an ordinary room” with light that projects its shade

Milan 2014: Japanese design studio YOY presented a lamp that projects the shape of a shade onto a wall and a rug that doubles as a chair in Milan this week (+ slideshow).

YOY collection in Milan 2014

The new collection from YOY includes a tray that appears to defy gravity and a series of drawers that can be mounted on the wall, as well as the rug and two lamps.

YOY collection in Milan 2014

"In this exhibition, we tried to make a new story between a product and a space," YOY co-founder Naoki Ono told Dezeen. "We would like to create strange feelings with humour in an ordinary room."

YOY collection in Milan 2014

The table and floor lamps are both made from aluminium and plastic. Rather than using a light bulb, the designs have a hole in the head with an LED light inside, which projects the shape of a shade onto a nearby wall.

The rug has a 10-millimetre-thick aluminium sheet inside that makes it strong enough to hold the weight of a person when rolled, enabling it to be used as a seat. The black fabric is made from polyester and elastic.

YOY collection in Milan 2014

The wooden tray, called Protrude, appears to be perilously perched on the edge of a table when in fact it is fixed with a stainless-steel clip.

YOY collection in Milan 2014

The drawers are designed to hang on a wall and have a mirror inside to make them appear deeper. They come in small, medium and large, and are available in black and white plastic.

YOY collection in Milan 2014

The pieces are showing at stand D-43, Salone Sattelite, Fiera Hall 15 in the Salone Internazionale del Mobile, Milan from 8 - 13 April.

YOY collection in Milan 2014

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Marc Thorpe reimagines garden vine to create steel table

Milan 2014: Brooklyn-based designer Marc Thorpe is showing a range of tables inspired by leaves and stems in Milan this year (+ slideshow).

Morning Glory tables by Marc Thorpe for Moroso

Designed by Marc Thorpe for the Italian brand Moroso, the collection is called Morning Glory and is made from powder-coated welded steel rods for the stems and laser cut bent steel plates for the leaves.

Morning Glory tables by Marc Thorpe for Moroso

The collection takes its name from the flowering vine that fills Thorpe's garden in New York.

"The Morning Glory project is a personal story," Thorpe told Dezeen. "My home garden in Brooklyn is covered in the vine. We live with it everyday. I'm inspired by the world around me and always look for what I like to call the modernism within."

Morning Glory tables by Marc Thorpe for Moroso

While in real life the leaves of the vine would catch water, Thorpe said his leaves were designed to hold something stronger – "like beer".

Morning Glory tables by Marc Thorpe for Moroso

Morning Glory is designed to be arranged in clusters. The tables come in a mix of autumnal and earth tones including forest green, burnt red and beige.

Morning Glory tables by Marc Thorpe for Moroso

The table is on display in Pavilion 16 at the Salone Del Mobile in Milan until 13 April.

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Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook rises above the Australian bush on stilts

This zigzagging house in Australia by Iredale Pedersen Hook is raised above the ground on stilts to minimise its impact on the native landscape and wildlife (+ slideshow).

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

The holiday home was designed by Australian studio Iredale Pedersen Hook for a site near the town of Nannup. Situated between a forest and a flood plain, the area provides a habitat for local fauna including emus, kangaroos and snakes.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

The house was given a cranked layout to create different experiences along its length. It was also lifted off the ground to enhance views and reduce disruption to the site.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

"This is a holiday house, a place of temporary inhabitation that offers a variety of experiences and relationship to the native landscape," said the architect. "Spaces are strung in a line, an open-ended line that allows one to enter, exist and then leave and continue."

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

The kinked plan optimises different views of the forest on one side and the horizon on the other. It accommodates outdoor living areas, including an enclosed balcony at the rear of the property and a pointed terrace that projects towards the flood plain.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

Windows on the angled facades alternate between vertical apertures that make the most of the view towards the nearby trees and longer openings overlooking the plain.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

The use of the stilts and their diagonal cross-braces references the fallen trees that are a common feature around the forest edge, while the material palette used for the exterior references its natural setting.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

"Materials were carefully selected to dialogue with the context," the architects explained. "Dark Colorbond steel, rusting steel and recycled jarrah [wood] contributes to the notion of the building as 'shadow'."

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

Long steel grate ramps lead to an entrance at one end of the house and a balcony at the other, continuing past the master bedroom and main living areas to the sheltered terrace.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

The main entrance opens into a dark corridor that meanders past bedrooms, a laundry and a study, before reaching the two terraces on either side of the bright, open-plan living and dining room.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

The architects said they wanted to enhance the experience of moving between interior and exterior spaces by emulating the experience of "wandering through a forest in and out of darkness and openness."

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

Richly textured, dark jarrah wood used on the floor of the corridor contrasts with the bright living spaces, while carefully chosen colours and textures were introduced throughout the interior to evoke the natural surroundings.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

Treated plantation pine was used for 90 per cent of the building's framework and recycled local timber features on the outdoor decks as well as internal flooring and storage.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

Photovoltaic panels on the roof supply the home's power and a solar-powered system heats its water, which includes rainwater captured from the roof.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

Photography is by Peter Bennetts.

Here's a project description from Iredale Pedersen Hook:


Nannup Holiday House

The Nannup Holiday house forms part of a wandering path through the landscape from Perth to Nannup. This path dialogues with the landscape of intense forest, meandering river and rolling hills, each experience is carefully choreographed to enrich the occupancy of the house. A Jeykll and Hyde experience of the landscape is carefully controlled through oscillating vertical (forest) and horizontal (horizon) openings and the contrast of grounded and floating experiences. While the exterior dialogues with the numerous fallen trees, the interior is revealed through a sequence of 'growth rings' coded and extruded in relation to the building program.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

Program Resolution

This is a holiday house, a place of temporary inhabitation that offers a variety of experiences and relationship to the native landscape. Spaces are strung in a line, an open-ended line that allows one to enter, exist and then leave and continue. The house is part of a broader and longer experience that constitutes the experience of being on 'holiday', the travel to and from the site and the experience of visiting local towns and tourist attractions are then contemplated and celebrated in the context of this residence. Spaces are organised to provide a sense of seclusion and retreat, guests view the forest from a distance through vertical windows, the boys view the horizon and rolling hills through shared horizontal openings and the parents almost touch the natural landscape. These areas are collected by a dark, twisting and cranking space clad in recycled jarrah that oscillates between interior and exterior creating a sense of ambiguity and wondering through a forest in and out of darkness and openness. Outlook from this space is carefully controlled to provide detailed relief, openings also align to view through interior to exterior to interior and back to exterior.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

Built form context relationship

The building hovers above the native landscape minimising disturbance, it is a shadow to the immense forest, cranking in plan and undulating in section. The plan twists in relationship to program requirements and variety of views. The section undulates in direct dialogue to the backdrop forest enriching the spatial experience with variety and complexity; spatial proportion varies between rooms capturing the verticality of the forest and the horizontality of the horizon.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

It sits between the edge of the forest and the edge of the flood plain, the space between fire and flood, a fragile zone of existence. The ground level is dominated by roaming wild pigs (the size of humans), tiger snakes, dugites and other less threatening native fauna including emus and kangaroos. The elevated house with access via the steel grate ramps creates a safe retreat to observe nature.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

Materials were carefully selected to dialogue with the context, dark Colorbond steel, rusting steel and recycled Jarrah contributes to the notion of the building as 'shadow'. This concept continues internally, the main passage being dark and an extension of the exterior (recycled Jarrah) and primary living spaces being lighter and more connected to the exterior (recycled WA Blackbutt). Small fragments of intense colour capture the colours of the forest undergrowth.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

Integration of Allied Disciplines

The core building team camped on site during construction; it became an obsession, highly crafted and full of pride. Our structural engineer also travelled regularly to site while visiting his own holiday farm in the vicinity. His knowledge of local conditions and contractors was highly valued. The project enjoyed a high level of respect and collaboration between all teams; this is reflected in the end result.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

Sustainability

This project offers a holistic approach to environmental sustainability commencing with design and placement of access paths. The vehicle access path is placed along the site edge an area that requires annual clearing for the firebreak. This enables us to minimise the clearing of land. The materials required to build the access path were quarried from the site (gravel and clean yellow sand). These areas were immediately rehabilitated with plant species already existing on the site.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

The house was sited and designed to minimise clearing of bush and removal of trees. The area under the house is then free for re-introducing local species and will be fed by the grey water recycling.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook

Materials were selected based on a life cycle analysis of embodied energy, Colorbond cladding provides a durable exterior core and inhabited areas include recycled Jarrah and recycled WA Blackbutt. Timber off cuts was re-used for storeroom linings.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook
Plan - click for larger image

The building structure is 90% treated plantation pine and most furniture constructed from hoop pine plantation plywood. The structure was mostly pre-fabricated to minimise building waste.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook
East elevation - click for larger image

The long roof form increases the capacity to capture rainwater, this is re-used in the house. Grey Water is recycled for garden watering under the house. Water is heated from a solar hot water system with back up instantaneous gas hot water systems located close to areas of water use to minimise water waste. Water consumption is reduces with rated fixtures and fittings.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook
South elevation - click for larger image

Photo Voltaic cells balanced over the year easily cover consumption requirements. Power consumption is minimised through energy efficient equipment, use of LED and Compact Fluorescent globes and feature wall mounted light fittings manufactured from plantation plywood.

Nannup Holiday House by Iredale Pedersen Hook
West elevation - click for larger image

Applied coatings are minimised and generally Low Voc or oil.

Architects: Iredale Pedersen Hook architects
Architectural Project Team: Adrian Iredale, Finn Pedersen, Martyn Hook, Drew Penhale, Caroline Di Costa, Jason Lenard, Matthew Fletcher
Structural Engineer: Terpkos Engineering
Builder: Brolga Developments and Construction

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Hillside hideaway by GSMM Architetti features a courtyard for stargazing

This bright white house in Portugal by GSMM Architetti uses the trees on its hillside site to create a sense of intimacy, providing a counterbalance for the openness of its central courtyard  (+ slideshow).

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM

Miles away from the nearest town, the single-storey House in Quinta do Carvalheiro was designed by local studio GSMM Architetti as a quiet retreat that has as little impact on the landscape as possible.

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM

"This is a holiday house; a place to renovate energy, to get close to the wild nature, to live in a different way. A place to be alone, for meditation or to be among friends," architect Monica Margarido told Dezeen.

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM

"Our translation was to design a house where spaces were defined by transparency and reflection of the landscape, to feel protected but at the same time to feel emerged into the forest," she added.

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM

Cork oak and pine trees surround the house and help to shade it from the sun. "The dense cork trees that surround the house provide intimacy," said Margarido.

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM

The house has a square plan with a courtyard at its centre, offering residents an uninterrupted view of the skies.

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM

"You lay down on the patio and you dive among thousands of stars, in your transparent envelope," explained architect Giorgia Conversi, who also worked on the project.

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM

An expansive living area runs along the southern side of the house. Sliding glass panels line two walls, allowing the space to open out to both the courtyard and surroundings.

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM

A fireplace separates the living area from the kitchen. There is also a sheltered terrace where residents can dine al fresco.

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM

Two north-facing bedrooms sit on the opposite side of the courtyard, while a master suite and guest bedroom run along the eastern side of the house.

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM

Photography is by Fernando Guerra.

Here's some text from the architect Giorgia Conversi:


House Quinta Do Carvalheiro, São Francisco da Serra, Portugal

A new presence in the light and shade of cork trees. Clean and sharp. I'm here. I'm here, but let me cross. Occupy a space without closing. Play changing face between the white presence and the absence of glass: let me cross from the shadows of branches and give back their image to the around gnarled trunks.

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM

Quinta do Carvalheiro is another way of living. Enter and you're still out. In the middle of the trees. In every point the look finds the way to project far away.

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM

The walls are a pause between a glimpse and other. A border to cross, like all boundaries. A unit of measure for the space that extends around.

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM

A challenge to the concept of "locked at home". Within four walls. In ourselves. The house doesn't obscure the view but reveals it. Doesn’t take away the other, doesn't take away the sky. But is there.

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM

The first day is alienation. The second you start to feel it, the Quinta: is of few words but is there. The third: you lay down on the patio and you dive among thousands of stars, in your transparent envelope. Protected but free. The fourth, you realize that you can change perspective. Look inside. And, as a game of mirrors, seek your hidden corner.

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM

An open house, first of all, to mental disposition. Open to people who arrive, to changing light, to curious insects, to the moon peeping from the hill, to ideas, to the next new discovery.

House in Quinta do Carvalheiro by GSMM
Floor plan - click for larger image

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Fairytale-inspired chair shrouds the sitter with a red hood

Milan 2014: German designer Hanna Emelie Ernsting has developed a chair with an integrated red blanket that wraps around the sitter like Little Red Riding Hood's cape (+ slideshow).

Red Riding Hood chair Hanna Emelie Ernsting Milan

Designed by Hanna Emelie Ernsting and called Red Riding Hood, the piece is a round-backed, grey armchair with a grey and red blanket attached around and under the seat.

Red Riding Hood chair Hanna Emelie Ernsting Milan

When there isn't a sitter the blanket falls, grey side down, over the back of the seat. When someone sits in it they can draw the blanket around them like a cape.

Red Riding Hood chair Hanna Emelie Ernsting Milan

"Evenings are the time for stories, dreams and fairytales," said Ernsting. "After a strenuous workday, we long to escape for a time from everyday life and lose ourselves in the world of a book or film. These contrasting circumstances underlie the design of this armchair."

Red Riding Hood chair Hanna Emelie Ernsting Milan

"The chair reinterprets these two facets of day and evening, work and leisure time, reality and fairyland, waking and dreaming – the rational and the whimsical," she added.

Red Riding Hood chair Hanna Emelie Ernsting Milan

The material used is loden, a traditional German-Austrian woven wool fabric that is often used for coats because of its water and dirt-resistant qualities.

Red Riding Hood chair Hanna Emelie Ernsting Milan

The armchair is on show in hall 13 booth D27 at the Salone Internazionale del Mobile in Milan.

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