Rorschach Test With Food

Bien connu pour être produit avec des tâches d’encres, le test de Rorschach est ici réinterprété par le photographe Esther Lobo avec des aliments tels que des yaourts, crèmes glacées et sauces en tout genre. On obtient des motifs colorés avec des effets de reliefs intéressants, d’autant plus que le packaging de l’aliment utilisé est exposé. À découvrir.

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Rorschach Test With Food

Gesture Control Armband

Combler l’écart entre les humains et la technologie : à l’heure d’une informatique portable et omniprésente, comment pouvons-nous connecter mondes réel et numérique ? Voici la question à laquelle les équipes de ThalmicLabs ont essayé de répondre avec leur projet Myo. Un bracelet qui se porte autour du bras et qui, grâce à ses capteurs de mouvements, permet de prendre le contrôle à distance d’applications.

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Domo Dom house by Tadeusz Lemanski arches up to face the sky

The front of this house in Kraków, Poland, is curved dramatically up towards the sky so that Polish architect Tadeusz Lemański could squeeze a garage underneath (+ slideshow).

Domo Dom by Tadeusz Lemanski

Tadeusz Lemański designed the building – known as Domo Dom – for a single resident who was keen to have a garage in his home, despite local planning rules that tightly restricted the size and shape of the new structure.



“The main idea of the project was to design each room in the way that they do not lose anything from their functionality,” explained the architect. “At the same time, the house has to meet land development conditions that impose using gable roofs.”

Domo Dom by Tadeusz Lemanski

Lemański’s solution was to create a single-storey volume and abstract it, so the end angles up towards the sky. This allowed a boxy garage volume to be slotted in underneath.

Domo Dom by Tadeusz Lemanski

“The concept of the house is a simple cube that includes the main functions – living room, kitchenette and bedroom,” he said. “In order to fulfil the development conditions, the bedroom was lifted to the loft and the garage was moved under it.”

Domo Dom by Tadeusz Lemanski

The house is located in a suburban neighbourhood on the edge of Wolski Forest, west Kraków. To echo the materials used on the more traditional neighbouring structures, the architect specified grey sandstone and black titanium-zinc panels for the exterior cladding.

Domo Dom by Tadeusz Lemanski

The contrasting shades of these two materials also help to emphasise the division between the main living spaces and the garage.

Domo Dom by Tadeusz Lemanski

The garage door fronts the building, so the main entrance is situated along one of the side walls.

It leads through to a compact hallway with a combined living room and kitchen to the left, a bathroom in front, and a staircase on the right that leads up to the first-floor bedroom.

Domo Dom by Tadeusz Lemanski

Two side windows are angled to match the slope of the staircase, which runs alongside the garage wall.

“Their shape underlines the dynamism of the building that rises in the same direction,” added Lemański.

Domo Dom by Tadeusz Lemanski

In the bedroom, the unusual shape of the roof creates a ceiling that rises up to a point then curves down so much that it almost meets the floor.

Three skylights bring daylight into the space, while built-in wooden fittings offer seating and storage.

Domo Dom by Tadeusz Lemanski

At the rear of the house, a wall of glazing allows the resident to open his living space out to an elevated terrace and a lawn.

Domo Dom by Tadeusz Lemanski

Photography is by Tomasz Zakrzewski.

Domo Dom by Tadeusz Lemanski
Ground floor plan – click for larger image
Domo Dom by Tadeusz Lemanski
First floor plan – click for larger image
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Section one – click for larger image
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Section two – click for larger image

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arches up to face the sky
appeared first on Dezeen.

Tesseron Cognac: Steeped in viticulture heritage, the French brandy-maker draws on spirits from the 12th Century for blending

Tesseron Cognac

It comes as no surprise that Tesseron Cognac—with its family lineage at the pinnacle of winemaking—is among the more graceful and interesting offerings in the world of brandy. Alfred Tesseron is the current director of the stunning estate in the……

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Friday Photo: The Leica That Took the Reichstag

(Bonhams)
(Yevgeny Khalder)OK, so it’s the Leica that took the photo of Russian troops taking the Reichstag, but you get the idea! Alas, there is no Black Friday discount on this camera, which goes on the block tomorrow in Hong Kong as part of Bonhams’ droolworthy Leica centenary sale (note to Tom Sachs: there’s also a fine circa-1966 NASA model up for grabs) and is estimated to fetch between 3 million and 4 million Hong Kong dollars—approximately $390,000-$520,000 at current exchange.

While working as a photojournalist for the Soviet news agency TASS, Yevgeni Khaldei used the trusty chrome Leica III to take Raising a Flag over the Reichstag (above), one of the most famous photographs of World War II. There is more than Khaldei’s eye and the Leica’s Elmar 3.5cm f/3.5 lens to thank for the image: taken on May 2, 1945, it’s a restaging of the moment two days earlier when Red Army fighters had first flown the Soviet flag over the Reichstag (Germans had fought back and dislodged the Red Army, scuttling that photo op). And there was also a bit of Soviet-style proto-Photoshopping involved: more smoke was added to suggest that the fighting was still taking place and the soldiers’ looted watches were made to vanish from their wrists and from history.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Steve McCurry India Photography

Steve McCurry n’a plus sa réputation à faire en matière de photographie. Depuis des années, le célèbre photographe voyage de pays en pays pour en capturer des images uniques et spontanées. Dans cette série, nous découvrons l’Inde, ses habitants, leurs coutumes et l’atmosphère qui y règne à travers une sélection d’images pleines de couleurs.

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_DSC3529, Kumbh Mela Festival, India, 2010, INDIA-10867
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00533_ 19, Dentist's Clinic, Ujjain, India, 2004, INDIA-11029
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Playing Cards, Agra, India, 1999.The Unguarded Moment" />

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Cambodia hotel features tiny terraced rooms that "look like houses"

Inside Festival 2014: Yuki Fukumoto of Japanese architects FHAMS discusses the unusual rooms at Tama Hotel in Phnom Penh, which won the Hotel category at this year’s Inside Festival.

Tama Hotel Phnom Penh Tower by FHAMS

FHAMS‘ Tama Hotel hotel occupies the top floor of the 22-story Phnom Penh Tower in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

Tama Hotel Phnom Penh Tower by FHAMS

Guests can choose from a variety of different room sizes, the smallest of which are contained within a row of tiny wooden huts.

Tama Hotel Phnom Penh Tower by FHAMS

“The main design [feature] in the hotel is the smallest room, which only has five square metres and looks like a house,” explains Fukumoto in the movie via a translator, which was filmed at Inside Festival 2014.

Tama Hotel Phnom Penh Tower by FHAMS

Each hut squeezes in a single bed, sofa and desk into the limited space, but larger, more traditional hotel rooms are also available, offering double beds and views out across the Cambodian capital.

Tama Hotel Phnom Penh Tower by FHAMS

“Most of the rooms have big windows and you get to enjoy the view of the city,” Fukumoto says.

Tama Hotel Phnom Penh Tower by FHAMS

FHAMS also designed the hotel’s bar and restaurant, which is separated into distinct zones. Guests can choose to eat in a formal restaurant area, or more causal arrangements of sofas, chairs and booths.

Tama Hotel Phnom Penh Tower by FHAMS

“The main focus of the hotel is dining rather than accommodation,” Fukumoto claims. “We designed the dining area based on time zones by imaging somebody’s day in a hotel.”

Tama Hotel Phnom Penh Tower by FHAMS

Inside Festival took place at Marina Bay Sands in Singapore from 1 to 3 October. Award entries for next year’s festival are open from February 2015.

We’ve been publishing interviews with all the category winners from this year’s event over the last few weeks. You can watch all the movies below.

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rooms that “look like houses”
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This week on Dezeen

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This week we featured a barn-like house with a modern interior (pictured), reported on NASA’s first 3D-printed object in space and asked the creator of Comic Sans why designers don’t like his typeface. Read on for more architecture and design highlights.

CTBUH report details of unfinished skyscrapers
CTBUH report details of unfinished skyscrapers

New research revealed that 50 of the world’s tallest unfinished skyscrapers will “never complete” as a consequence of financial fiascos and political problems.

OMA CCTV building Beijing
OMA’s CCTV building in Beijing

Rem Koolhaas hit back at the Chinese president’s “weird architecture” comments by saying the country “will benefit” from structures like his CCTV building, and a pair of Shanghai towers were deemed safe, despite suffering severe subsidence.

George Lucas Museum of Narrative Art in Chicago by MAD and Studio Gang
George Lucas Museum of Narrative Art in Chicago by MAD and Studio Gang

Frank Gehry returned to the headlines as he defended MAD’s design for the George Lucas Museum and Foster + Partners was revealed to be working on the “world’s first commercial concrete-printing robot”.

Milan food course IULM University and Scuola Politecnica di Design_dezeen_sq
Milan universities team up to launch “unique” food design degree

In other news, one of Italy’s leading design schools announced it would be launching a food design degree and rumours surfaced that online retailer Fab.com is in $15 million acquisition talks.

Trestle table by John Pawson
Trestle table by John Pawson

Popular projects this week on Dezeen included John Pawson’s pared-back range of furniture, a Sydney home clad with rough timber boards and a lakeside sauna in Toronto.

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Lakeside sauna by Partisans

More architecture | More interiors | More design | More news

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Knight Mills + Goodhood Limited Edition Floor Runner: Sourced and crafted in Santa Fe, each rug takes over 25 hours to weave on America's only Jacquard loom

Knight Mills + Goodhood Limited Edition Floor Runner

In 2007, Goodhood opened its doors on a back street in Shoreditch, promising Londoners a curious collection of clothing and home goods. Last September, founders Jo Sindle and Kyle Stewart expanded their inventory and moved shop a block away to a……

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Graphic and Colorful Portraits by Erik Jones

Les toiles d’Erik Jones sont aussi graphiques que colorées. Avec des portraits hyperréalistes de femmes nues se cachant derrière des bandes sporadiques de couleurs, l’artiste exprime cette supposée pudeur en appliquant plusieurs matériaux tels que de l’aquarelle, acrylique, pastel, huile et crayons de couleur. À découvrir dans la galerie.

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Graphic and Colorful Portraits by Erik Jones