Filipe Pina + Maria Inês Costa add concrete extension to stone house in Portugal

A glass-fronted stairwell joins a craggy stone building to its new concrete extension at this Portuguese house by Filipe Pina + Maria Inês Costa (+ slideshow).

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

Filipe Pina + Maria Inês Costa designed the 260-square-metre family home, named House JA, for a site in the city of Guarda, northern Portugal.



A living room, kitchen and garage are positioned across the ground floor of the building, with three bedrooms and a library on the upper floor.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

The Portuguese studio joined a smooth concrete extension to existing stone ruins on the plot and inserted a glazed channel through the centre of the two structures that frames the oak staircase within.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

“The house is meant to combine the rural and the urban lifestyle,” said the architects.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

The addition of the concrete volume filled the plot of land around the stone structure, leaving no space around the outside for the family.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

A narrow passageway laid with stepping-stones cuts between the two buildings and leads to a double-height section of glazing that reveals the open-tread staircase inside.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

The inclusion of a small decked courtyard where the old and new buildings meet provides an outdoor area and natural light for the interior space.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

The wooden staircase rises between a glazed wall that looks onto the courtyard and the previously external stone wall of the historic building.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

This wall, now encapsulated by the new concrete structure, is left exposed to retain the “memory of the old house.”

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

“The principle was to introduce light in the middle of the house. Two different empty spaces were generated: the entrance, and the heart of the house – the courtyard,” said the architects.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

Lengths of metal wire stretch between the wooden steps and the ceiling to partially enclose the well, creating a safety rail but also allowing light from the adjoining courtyard and glazed entrance to penetrate to the interior space.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

The staircase is divided into two metal-framed sections, with the lower portion attached to the ground floor and a white plastered wall, and the second section to the wall and the first floor.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

On the ground floor, sections of oak panelling to the right of the staircase conceal two doorways cut through the stone walls that lead into a double garage. On the left, an open-plan living and dining area are arranged around the small glazed courtyard.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

On the upper level, the staircase connects to a wooden walkway that passes to the left through the stone wall of the old structure to a master suite above the garage. To the right of the staircase it leads to two further bedrooms, a bathroom and a library.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

Storage built into the white hallway walls maximises the space available on the upper floor.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

Deep black window frames protrude from the facade of the concrete volume and overhang the street below, creating a small Juliette balcony for an upper floor bedroom, while sections of black-framed glazing sit flush with the stone facade of the old building.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

“The scale and the site identity were always present in the construction details and material choices,” they said.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa

Photography is by Joao Morgado.

House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa
Ground floor plan – click for larger image
House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa
First floor plan – click for larger image
House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa
Roof plan – click for larger image
House JA by Filipe Pina + Ines Costa
Section – click for larger image

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extension to stone house in Portugal
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Gareth Pugh Spring 2015 Collection

Cet automne, Gareth Pugh a dévoilé sa collection de prêt-à-porter pour le printemps 2015. Comme inspiré des tenues folkloriques lors des rituels sorciers, le créateur a conçu des costumes déroutants : des coupes droites, géométriques, des motifs hypnotiques et des couleurs toujours neutres. une sélection de la collection est à découvrir en images.

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Gareth Pugh Spring 2015 Collection-10B
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The Art of Discovery with Renaissance Hotels: Photographer Jeff Vespa releases an intimate book of portraiture with the support of Renaissance Hotels and The Creative Coalition

The Art of Discovery with Renaissance Hotels


Advertorial content: This past week we attended the release of Rizzoli’s “The Art of Discovery”—a collection of intimate portraiture featuring many of Hollywood’s most recognizable faces. Each image and the accompanying text was…

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Knit Merino Wool Hats from Rustic Thread: Super-soft, dip-dyed beanies made in Joshua Tree by hand

Knit Merino Wool Hats from Rustic Thread


Inside a small boutique called The End, in the arid desert of Old Town Yucca Valley, CA, we stumbled upon some hats that beckoned to be touched and held. The…

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Muji's Latest Pre-Fab Re-Thinks the Design of a House

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As we’ve written before, building an urban home in Japan comes with two built-in issues: Earthquakes and tight spaces. Muji’s latest iteration of their pre-fab home, the Vertical House (which now has a model available for public viewing in Tokyo’s Arakawa district), addresses both of these issues via design.

What’s interesting, at least to this Westerner’s eyes, is the way they went about it. First off, the anti-earthquake joints. Traditional Japanese construction features complicated mortise-and-tenons (below right in the line drawing) where beams meet columns. Under Muji’s design (below left in the line drawing) the individual components are beefed up and wooden tongues are replaced with robust hardware designed to maximize strength under seismic loads.

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Secondly is the way they’ve chosen to subdivide the space. Building upwards in a plot with a tiny footprint is a no-brainer, but rather than have contiguous floors, they’ve opted to first bi-sect the house with an open staircase…

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…and then build slightly staggered levels to either side to create six different “zones.”

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It’s like having a succession of differing-height lofts rather than conventional levels or stories. By staggering floors in this manner, each “zone” is distinguished and delineated by the position its floor occupies in space, rather than by potentially claustrophobic walls contained within such a small footprint. (Cultural note: While this wouldn’t fly in privacy-obsessed America, consider that traditional homes in Japan are far less likely to invite “company,” or non-family members, into their houses; and that the traditional Japanese notion of privacy involves nothing more than a rice-paper-thin sliding door.)

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This week on Dezeen

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This week on Dezeen we published a flying car, a drone designed to help save lives and a 3D printer hacked to create a tattooing robot (pictured). Read on for more architecture and design highlights, plus our Dezeen Music Project track of the week.

Bêtapé is a smooth, free-flowing electronica track by Lille producer Aimedeuxhaine.

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The Rom Skatepark awarded listed status
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The Rom Skatepark in east London made architectural history this week as it was given protected status by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport on the advice of English Heritage. It’s the first European facility of its kind to be protected by such a measure.

John McAslan + Partners wins bid to design Dhaka metro line
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British architecture firm John McAslan + Partners was announced as the winners of an international competition to design Dhaka’s first metro line, and a Finnish committee responsible for the restoration of Alvar Aalto’s Viipuri Library won the World Monuments Fund/Knoll Modernism prize.

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£3.4 billion crafts sector is “far bigger than we thought” says Crafts Council

We reported on Crafts Council’s claim that small craft businesses in the UK contribute much more to the economy than previously thought and Sebastian Cox – a young designer championing the revival of traditional crafts in the UK – spoke to us about what we can learn from neglected techniques.

Augmented Skin by Kazushi Miyamoto, Youngseok Doo and Theodora Maria Moudatsou
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Popular projects included an experimental technique for creating intricate building components, a wooden extension designed to screen a home from a “monster” development next door, and a house featuring a black glass facade.

Sydenham house by Ian McChesney
Sydenham house by Ian McChesney

More architecture | More interiors | More design | More news

The post This week on Dezeen appeared first on Dezeen.

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Dans cette série, la photographe Stéphanie Gonot met en place des set designs culinaire spéciaux Goth. Des mûres en guise de sushis, des croix et vanités en argent, des bougies blanches. Un travail esthétique revisitant avec goût la nature morte pour un résultat d’une beauté sombre. Plus de détails dans la suite.

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Handcrafted Jaguar-undi Bags: Vibrant textiles sourced from across Latin and South America beautifully unite through a common thread

Handcrafted Jaguar-undi Bags


At this year’s Pitch Night, we got hands-on with the bags of Jaguar-undi—a family-run start-up that sources traditional textiles from various regions across the Americas (Latin and South) and stitches them together into unique handcrafted…

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